Episode 12

Teresa Caro: Transformational Leadership in Marketing

Published on: 18th July, 2022

Passionate about how new media and technologies create opportunities for brands and impact the overall customer experience, Teresa is a sought-after thought leader. Both an author and speaker, Teresa has been quoted in leading publications like Harvard Business Review, USA Today, NPR, and Forbes on how businesses can succeed in our evolving digital marketplace. She speaks at numerous marketing events, including CMOUS, Mediapost, and AdTech. Her work has been recognized by leading awards such as Cannes Lions, Clio Awards, One Show, Effie Awards, and Radio Mercury. Teresa worked with leading Publicis Groupe agencies such as Razorfish and Moxie before joining the Johnson Group as President in 2022. 

In this episode of The Backstory on Marketing, Teresa speaks on the topic of transformational leadership in an ever changing industry, touching on the intersection of data and creativity. In addition, Teresa shares advice she gives to first-time CMOs and women leaders, stressing the importance of acting with confidence and seeking out mentors in all stages of one’s career. 

Links 

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Teresa Caro's LinkedIn

The Johnson Group Website

Video of Interview

Transcript
Guy Powell:

Hi, I'm Guy Powell and welcome to the next episode

Guy Powell:

of the Backstory on Marketing. If you haven't already done so,

Guy Powell:

please visit Prorelevant.com and sign up for all of these

Guy Powell:

episodes and podcasts. I am the author of the just released

Guy Powell:

book, The Post-COVID Marketing Machine: prepare your team to

Guy Powell:

win. You can find more information on this at marketing

Guy Powell:

machine dot prorelevant.com. Today we'll be speaking with

Guy Powell:

Teresa Caro. She is passionate about how new media and

Guy Powell:

technologies create opportunities for brands and

Guy Powell:

impact the overall customer experience. Theresa is a sought

Guy Powell:

after thought leader. Both an author and speaker Teresa has

Guy Powell:

been quoted in leading publications like Harvard

Guy Powell:

Business Review, USA Today, NPR and Forbes on how businesses can

Guy Powell:

succeed in an evolving digital marketplace. She speaks at

Guy Powell:

numerous marketing events, including CMO US media posts and

Guy Powell:

ad texts. Her work has been recognized by leading awards

Guy Powell:

such as Cannes lion Clio awards, won show Effie awards and radio

Guy Powell:

mercury. Teresa worked with leading publicist, publicists

Guy Powell:

group agencies such as Razorfish and Moxie before joining now the

Guy Powell:

Johnson group as president now in 2022. Welcome, Teresa.

Teresa Caro:

Thank you, guy.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, it's great to have you really appreciate it.

Guy Powell:

And you've certainly got a great background. And so definitely

Guy Powell:

looking forward to our chat. So tell us a more little bit more

Guy Powell:

about how you got into marketing.

Teresa Caro:

Well, I sort of fell into it. And yes, I'm going

Teresa Caro:

to admit how old I am. In the early 90s, and as we discussed

Teresa Caro:

last night, Guy, and your book launch in the early 90s, on the

Teresa Caro:

east coast, and potentially the Midwest, going through some

Teresa Caro:

difficult times. And so graduating school, I just took

Teresa Caro:

the first job that I could find, thankfully, it was with Ford

Teresa Caro:

Motor Company. But I realized very quickly that from a sales

Teresa Caro:

perspective, that wasn't my jam. And working with consultants and

Teresa Caro:

talking to a lot of people, I realized that I loved supporting

Teresa Caro:

the sales process, through marketing, not so much being the

Teresa Caro:

front end of it. So thus was born my marketing career. From

Teresa Caro:

there, I discovered that I love brands, I've worked with a lot

Teresa Caro:

of great brands, but I love the energy and the excitement and

Teresa Caro:

the diversity of advertising agencies. So as you look through

Teresa Caro:

my my resume my LinkedIn profile, you'll see various

Teresa Caro:

things that I've done throughout my career. But I keep coming

Teresa Caro:

back to the advertising agency world. And I'm excited that Joe

Teresa Caro:

Johnson has invited me to help him lead his organization of 26

Teresa Caro:

years- the Johnson group.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, absolutely. So you were just named the

Guy Powell:

president of the Johnson Group, but also the chief dragon slayer

Guy Powell:

it looks like so group and, and how you're gonna slay some great

Guy Powell:

dragons?

Teresa Caro:

Well, we we definitely love slaying our

Teresa Caro:

giants. Yes, we are an advertising and marketing firm.

Teresa Caro:

We have been around for 26 years. And you may think with us

Teresa Caro:

and yes, it says it right here. You may think that giant slaying

Teresa Caro:

means that we are we help small brands compete against the big

Teresa Caro:

brands. And and that's really the analogy of David and

Teresa Caro:

Goliath. And that how we use that. But in reality, if you

Teresa Caro:

look at the story between the Giant and David, this is really

Teresa Caro:

a huge challenge that everyone was afraid to tackle, right. And

Teresa Caro:

then David comes along with a very simple creative solution

Teresa Caro:

and kills Italy's the Giant, right. And that's what the

Teresa Caro:

Johnson Group has been doing for over two decades really working

Teresa Caro:

with key brands, leaders in their space, and figuring out

Teresa Caro:

who are their giants? Who do they need to slay? And how do we

Teresa Caro:

come up with creative ideas to go about doing it? So it's very

Teresa Caro:

exciting, but I'm able to join such a well-established

Teresa Caro:

organization and help them take to help take them to the next

Teresa Caro:

level.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, absolutely. You know what, I really liked

Guy Powell:

the analogy with David and Goliath kind of the young

Guy Powell:

upstart versus the entrenched big leader and, and you know,

Guy Powell:

it's interesting when you think about Goliath and and, you know,

Guy Powell:

in the bigger brands and as a small brand, you're always

Guy Powell:

afraid of the big brands because you think they're just going to

Guy Powell:

crush you, but they're also just stuck in their own momentum. And

Guy Powell:

you really do have the opportunity to slay dragons,

Guy Powell:

slay dragons. And so I really liked that. That analogy.

Teresa Caro:

Yeah, and it's not necessarily we work with some of

Teresa Caro:

the big giants in the space. But what's interesting is, those

Teresa Caro:

giants have their own giants. And you talk a lot about it in

Teresa Caro:

your book, guys, it's that it's not only your competitors, but

Teresa Caro:

some of those giants might be economic factors, cultural

Teresa Caro:

shifts, brand misperceptions, because something that's going

Teresa Caro:

on. And so how do we, how do we work with giants in the space to

Teresa Caro:

help them overcome their own personal giants, it's a very

Teresa Caro:

exciting time, especially now, there are a lot of nervous

Teresa Caro:

people what's going on? Personally, I nerd out about the

Teresa Caro:

space right now. Because we don't know where it's going. And

Teresa Caro:

to try to get ahead of it and come up with those simple

Teresa Caro:

creative solutions. That's where agency partners such as

Teresa Caro:

ourselves really come into play.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, and I think it's not only creative nowadays,

Guy Powell:

in terms of, you know, coming up with a great concept, you know,

Guy Powell:

the Aflac Duck or whatever it happens to be. But it's also

Guy Powell:

how, especially in digital how you mix that creative concept

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with how you actually bring it to the to the audience. And it's

Guy Powell:

that combination of creativity on both sides, that I think that

Guy Powell:

can really make a difference.

Teresa Caro:

Yes, absolutely.

Guy Powell:

Yeah. So I saw an article. And it's always

Guy Powell:

interesting, you know, when you hear people talk about data, and

Guy Powell:

I'm a data driven guy, my book is about data and building more

Guy Powell:

a marketing machine on using data to really help drive sales

Guy Powell:

through what marketing does and using analytics. And there was

Guy Powell:

an article in media post, and there were a couple of things,

Guy Powell:

which kind of stood out. And one was that, that CMOS 42% of the

Guy Powell:

CMOS say that data can inhibit creativity. And then there's 41%

Guy Powell:

that say exactly the opposite. And and so how do you see that?

Guy Powell:

So can data driven companies? Or do you see data driven analytics

Guy Powell:

really hindering? Or do you see it helping creativity?

Teresa Caro:

So it's interesting one, it made me chuckle the

Teresa Caro:

article, because 42% say one thing, and 41% said another, so

Teresa Caro:

it was what was what the article was saying, except for the fact

Teresa Caro:

that marketers can never agree, the thing that I did when when

Teresa Caro:

you share the article with me, it's I'm a bit of a word nerd,

Teresa Caro:

in that I have found through my career, that different people

Teresa Caro:

define different words differently. So the first thing

Teresa Caro:

I wanted to do is what does creativity mean? And and if you

Teresa Caro:

look at it, the definition of creativity is actually pretty

Teresa Caro:

dull. I'll read to you for a second... defined is the

Teresa Caro:

tendency to generate or recognize ideas, alternatives,

Teresa Caro:

or possibilities that may be useful in solving problems,

Teresa Caro:

communicating with others, and entertaining ourselves and

Teresa Caro:

others around her tell definition, when to say. And

Teresa Caro:

then you have data. And that definition is factual

Teresa Caro:

information, such as measurements or statistics, used

Teresa Caro:

as a basis for reasoning, discussion or calculation. When

Teresa Caro:

you combine those two things together, and yes, I'm pandering

Teresa Caro:

to the interviewer here, you have a whole section in your

Teresa Caro:

latest book around data, and how data doesn't necessarily mean

Teresa Caro:

dashboards, you have a whole section on that and, and how

Teresa Caro:

data means what's going on in the world. It means competitors,

Teresa Caro:

like we just talked about it, I'd love to explore and whole

Teresa Caro:

idea of how how culture can can be an important data point. And

Teresa Caro:

then you take that, and and those are the data things, you

Teresa Caro:

need someone smart enough to distill that down-tell a story.

Teresa Caro:

And then spark creativity. So if you take like creativity, I

Teresa Caro:

believe we can all agree creative is going back to what I

Teresa Caro:

said in the beginning of what's the challenge that we're trying

Teresa Caro:

to solve? What's the objective that we're trying to achieve?

Teresa Caro:

And how do we go best doing it? And how do we make a difference,

Teresa Caro:

and everyone else will data if used correctly, if not just

Teresa Caro:

numbers, but other aspects are distilled down, you spark that

Teresa Caro:

creativity, then great ideas come out of that. In terms of

Teresa Caro:

the ones that say that it doesn't work, then my argument

Teresa Caro:

would be then you don't have the right person distilling down the

Teresa Caro:

data and really bringing it to life and something that gets

Teresa Caro:

someone to be creative. There's nothing worse guy than white, I

Teresa Caro:

call it blank paper syndrome. We all get in a room with all of

Teresa Caro:

these blank whiteboards and sticky notes, and an assignment

Teresa Caro:

brief which assignment briefs are important saying that we

Teresa Caro:

need to increase sales by 20%. Here's our budget. And we have

Teresa Caro:

demographic data as you know, we're going after 35 to 55 year

Teresa Caro:

old females. Okay. But what else? What makes this particular

Teresa Caro:

audience important, unique? What cultural factors are going on?

Teresa Caro:

What are the competitors doing? What's the wind space? How can

Teresa Caro:

we really get the creative people in the room thinking

Teresa Caro:

creatively, that's when it works. And at the Johnson group,

Teresa Caro:

we like to say that we dig for big, well, we really dig into

Teresa Caro:

the insights and pull out something unique that no one

Teresa Caro:

else has thought of before. And then we come up with that

Teresa Caro:

creative idea to differentiate us or our, our partners from the

Teresa Caro:

rest of their competitive some really achieve those objectives.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, and I think, to your point about

Guy Powell:

understanding, well, first of all, the definition of creative

Guy Powell:

versus the definition of data, but really, really good creative

Guy Powell:

is also many times has the foundation of good data. And

Guy Powell:

data doesn't necessarily mean numb. I mean, of course, it

Guy Powell:

means numbers, but it doesn't necessarily mean we sold, you

Guy Powell:

know, 20 units last week, and we're gonna sell 21 This week,

Guy Powell:

and things like that. But when I think of data, and great,

Guy Powell:

absolutely great creative, I think back at the Campaign for

Guy Powell:

Real Beauty With, with Dove and with Unilever. And when they did

Guy Powell:

the research, they came up with these, this concept of self

Guy Powell:

esteem for basically teenage girls, and the lack that they

Guy Powell:

have. And they then use that one piece of data, and then blew it

Guy Powell:

out of the really blew it out with their whole campaign for

Guy Powell:

real beauty. And I think that's, that is a great example where on

Guy Powell:

the one hand, you're using the data, you're using the research,

Guy Powell:

and then you're driving your creative based on that, that

Guy Powell:

critical research.

Teresa Caro:

And that's a key thing, guy, because how many

Teresa Caro:

people when they see the word data, or they hear the word

Teresa Caro:

data, think numbers? No, there was no numbers in in the real

Teresa Caro:

beauty inside this is really understanding what's going on

Teresa Caro:

culturally, in the world. And, and that was the beginning of

Teresa Caro:

this, the self image of, of filters and, and just altering

Teresa Caro:

of what truly is real beauty and really leaning into that to the

Teresa Caro:

point that now dove is known for real beauty, you say real

Teresa Caro:

beauty, you think stuff you don't think anybody else. And so

Teresa Caro:

they truly owned that space through a key insight through

Teresa Caro:

that data point. That wasn't actually a number.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, absolutely. And then they also transition

Guy Powell:

that not only for the young, but also for I don't know if I want

Guy Powell:

to use the word old, because I don't consider. But then they

Guy Powell:

also have, you know, be comfortable in the skin you're

Guy Powell:

in. And and all of those insights and all of that and I

Guy Powell:

do cold I just like you do I call that data as well. That is

Guy Powell:

just critical stuff to know. And then when you're putting that

Guy Powell:

that creative together to really understand how your consumers or

Guy Powell:

how they how the culture is affecting your consumers how

Guy Powell:

you're advertising and messaging, and then how they are

Guy Powell:

going to respond to that. I think that's, that's really,

Guy Powell:

really critical.

Teresa Caro:

Great. Great.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, so Well, let's change the topic here a little

Guy Powell:

bit. So tell us what's it like? And what kind of advice would

Guy Powell:

you give to a brand new client side CMO?

Teresa Caro:

Oh, yes, well, first, no pressure. Brand new

Teresa Caro:

CMOS only lasted about six months. First time, CMOs only

Teresa Caro:

lasted about six months. So the biggest advice I would give to a

Teresa Caro:

first time CMO is hire an executive. That is the first

Teresa Caro:

thing that you do, you're going to need that that trusted

Teresa Caro:

sounding board to get you through it. Know that it's going

Teresa Caro:

to be fun. The first 3045 days, everybody's excited that you're

Teresa Caro:

there. They believe that you're going to solve a lot of things,

Teresa Caro:

know that it's going to be hard. That second phase is truly hard.

Teresa Caro:

Because you are going to bring in new ideas that no one else

Teresa Caro:

has thought of you are going to be investing in change. And

Teresa Caro:

sometimes that change impacts people and their jobs. They're

Teresa Caro:

your peers. You're your own boss because your own boss has a

Teresa Caro:

preconceived notion of who you are and what he or she expects

Teresa Caro:

of you. And then you even your own employees, you will in order

Teresa Caro:

to make an impact which you've probably been asked to do, you

Teresa Caro:

will have to make change and change is hard. Change is

Teresa Caro:

painful. Change is stressful. But then the third thing is no

Teresa Caro:

one's if you are confident in yourself. You take the time to

Teresa Caro:

hear people out. You Do you do that, that bridge building that

Teresa Caro:

consensus building that, that storytelling, once you get

Teresa Caro:

through the hard part over the other side, it's, it's really,

Teresa Caro:

really a fabulous, fabulous time I have throughout my career

Teresa Caro:

either both on the brand side and on the agency side, being

Teresa Caro:

considered that transformational leader, that growth leader, I'm

Teresa Caro:

usually not brought in to replace someone I'm usually

Teresa Caro:

brought into, to grow something to change something. And that's

Teresa Caro:

really what I've seen. And I'm in that second phase at the

Teresa Caro:

Johnson group now, and every single one of the people at the

Teresa Caro:

Johnson group would say love to have Theresa here, but change is

Teresa Caro:

hard. But I have learned and I have grown confident in the fact

Teresa Caro:

that once I get over that hump, what's really going to be smooth

Teresa Caro:

sailing from there, and very, very exciting.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, and it's actually interesting, I kind of

Guy Powell:

think about a brand manager, if the brand manager is not

Guy Powell:

bringing about change and disruption in the marketplace

Guy Powell:

with the consumers of their brands, then they will most

Guy Powell:

likely not be successful, if they're just gonna go steady

Guy Powell:

state make no changes, then they're more or less on the way

Guy Powell:

down. So they're, they're incentivized to make changes.

Guy Powell:

But the difference then for the CMO, especially a new CMO, or a

Guy Powell:

first time CMO, is you're know, you're not only making changes

Guy Powell:

on the outside, but you have to make changes on the inside. And,

Guy Powell:

and making changes to the team and making changes to the

Guy Powell:

broader team, which is the whole company. And those changes are

Guy Powell:

very, very painful. So I really like your point. And, and I like

Guy Powell:

your point as well about having an executive coach, because you

Guy Powell:

finally have a person that you can really trust as a trusted

Guy Powell:

adviser that doesn't have any skin in the game, other than to

Guy Powell:

make you successful. And that really makes a lot of sense.

Teresa Caro:

Absolutely, absolutely. And it's interesting

Teresa Caro:

that you've pointed out, Guy, that it is external change, but

Teresa Caro:

also an internal change. I have found throughout my career, and

Teresa Caro:

it's no different now it's people focus on the work, how

Teresa Caro:

are you going to improve the that that deliverable itself,

Teresa Caro:

people forget that in order to improve about on that

Teresa Caro:

deliverable, you need to clear the way. For those creative, we

Teresa Caro:

just talked about creative, you need to clear the way for those

Teresa Caro:

people to do some great creative thinking, you need to set them

Teresa Caro:

up for success, you need to get them the right tools. Which

Teresa Caro:

means really, the first step of being successful is people

Teresa Caro:

process and plumbing, really evaluating those and getting

Teresa Caro:

them in the right place. That takes time, you may move as

Teresa Caro:

quickly as you can to get those fixed, but it's not fast enough.

Teresa Caro:

And so there'll be a lot of pressure for you to skip to the

Teresa Caro:

work itself. You use the real beauty example in that cmo went

Teresa Caro:

on to Burger King. And now he's gone on to do other things. I

Teresa Caro:

have a huge fan of his real beauty was there before he got

Teresa Caro:

there. So it hadn't really taken off, can you imagine the amount

Teresa Caro:

of pressure he must have been on to make that hugely successful?

Teresa Caro:

Burger King, the same thing, they took a risk to do something

Teresa Caro:

within the Burger King app. So they could go up against

Teresa Caro:

McDonald's from what I read. And obviously it wasn't there. Nor

Teresa Caro:

was I lucky enough to be part of that agency. But it took over a

Teresa Caro:

year more of development. That's if we're if we move slow, if we

Teresa Caro:

go slow to go fast, which is a great link and President Lincoln

Teresa Caro:

quote, now you're gonna make an impact. And so going back to

Teresa Caro:

your original question of how do you become a successful CMO,

Teresa Caro:

stick your stick to your guns, be patient, be thoughtful. And

Teresa Caro:

also just make sure people come along for the ride. They

Teresa Caro:

understand what you what you are doing. You do have all of those

Teresa Caro:

ingredients. That is a true recipe for success.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, and I, I like you're one of the statistics you

Guy Powell:

gave before for a new CMO-a first time CMO- their average

Guy Powell:

tenure is six months. I hadn't heard that one. Normally it's

Guy Powell:

it's been over the last couple of years, maybe 24 months, I

Guy Powell:

guess for a seasoned CMO, maybe longer for a more seasoned CMO.

Guy Powell:

And one of the interesting things about six months is if

Guy Powell:

you're a new CMO, and you only have six months tenure to be

Guy Powell:

able to then prove yourself to get that seven month you're

Guy Powell:

unfortunately inheriting everything that the guy before

Guy Powell:

you was fired for your change your speed to make changes

Guy Powell:

significant and meaningful changes is really really under

Guy Powell:

the gun for that number one and number two, you know you have to

Guy Powell:

then at least If you if you can't make changes fast enough,

Guy Powell:

and certainly bigger brands are harder to make changes very

Guy Powell:

quickly, you have to then really develop that vision in the first

Guy Powell:

six months so that you can buy that, that seven month in that

Guy Powell:

eighth month,

Teresa Caro:

I would argue that vision needs to be defined

Teresa Caro:

within the first couple of months. That's, that's really,

Teresa Caro:

yeah, gonna be cute and get any everybody behind that vision.

Teresa Caro:

And understanding the steps in that vision, you do not have a

Teresa Caro:

lot of time to do that. And marketing is one of those things

Teresa Caro:

that we've always struggled with, and that everybody thinks

Teresa Caro:

that they can do marketing. You try to argue with an accountant,

Teresa Caro:

all of us know that we can't do accounting. But marketing,

Teresa Caro:

everybody feels like they can, they can do it. And so everybody

Teresa Caro:

questions, everything that you're doing. We've spoken Guy

Teresa Caro:

and pass conversations about when budgets are cut, and

Teresa Caro:

usually cut from marketing first. And so making sure,

Teresa Caro:

again, people process some plumbing, making sure your

Teresa Caro:

plumbing since in place, so when the CEO comes to you saying we

Teresa Caro:

need to cut $3 million, you can say very, very quickly and

Teresa Caro:

succinctly will, based on this report, if you cut 3 million,

Teresa Caro:

you're going to impact X number of million in revenue. That's

Teresa Caro:

the plumbing piece. So making sure the right people are in

Teresa Caro:

place, making sure that there's a process in place. So those

Teresa Caro:

people can be successful and making sure the plumbing is in

Teresa Caro:

place. So you can be successful you have the data, you have the

Teresa Caro:

information to show that you are making an impact on the

Teresa Caro:

organization. And if you are any member, or any budget dollar

Teresa Caro:

goes away, there is a direct impact on the organization

Teresa Caro:

itself.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, and that is a and that's kind of what our

Guy Powell:

business is about connecting marketing to selling and

Guy Powell:

connecting marketing to actual incremental sales. And and

Guy Powell:

that's a critical piece. And I used to we used to work with

Guy Powell:

Donna people's a long time ago when she was in Atlanta Gas

Guy Powell:

Light. And she did exactly like what you're saying the CEO came

Guy Powell:

to her and said, Listen, we need to cut a million dollars out of

Guy Powell:

your budget. And she says okay, yeah, no problem, then we need

Guy Powell:

to cut, you know, whatever it was $20 million in sales out of

Guy Powell:

the sales budget. And the CEO said, Oh, we don't?

Teresa Caro:

Yeah, exactly, exactly.

Guy Powell:

So we went to the next C suite, so to speak, and

Guy Powell:

took it somewhere else. And you know what, it's funny, too. It

Guy Powell:

is really unfortunate that quite often companies think about

Guy Powell:

cutting marketing first. And and even now with the hints of a

Guy Powell:

recession and the hints of reflect inflation. You know,

Guy Powell:

we're seeing that in the industry where the the marketers

Guy Powell:

are then doing everything they can to defend their budgets, and

Guy Powell:

realizing that even though maybe their effectiveness of their

Guy Powell:

marketing might go down in the recession, it's still better

Guy Powell:

than not doing the marketing at all. And that's a really

Guy Powell:

critical argument for the for the whole marketing team.

Teresa Caro:

Well, and it's so interesting that you use the

Teresa Caro:

Donna people's example, I've had similar experiences being on the

Teresa Caro:

agency side where the agency budgets are cut, and we're all

Teresa Caro:

disappointed and annoyed. And my point back to my team was, well,

Teresa Caro:

then we didn't do our job proving that we were making an

Teresa Caro:

impact that we were just spending the the clients money.

Teresa Caro:

And yes, it looked pretty. And we received a lot of engagement.

Teresa Caro:

But the numbers that mattered. We were looking at the metrics,

Teresa Caro:

the things that we tested and optimized and improved over

Teresa Caro:

time. But the numbers that mattered, the key performance

Teresa Caro:

indicators, we weren't rolling that back up and showing in a

Teresa Caro:

way that the CEOs understand and appreciate how that's going to

Teresa Caro:

make an impact. CEOs know that they need social media, and they

Teresa Caro:

need to be engaging with their audiences. But when it comes

Teresa Caro:

down to tightening that bell, and they're starting to ask why

Teresa Caro:

it's like, okay, that was a nice to have, not a need to have. So

Teresa Caro:

that's not going away. We all know intuitively as marketers

Teresa Caro:

that when that piece goes away, brand awareness goes away, and

Teresa Caro:

we lose control of the brand perception message. We know that

Teresa Caro:

intuitively, but an intuition doesn't pay the bills and

Teresa Caro:

doesn't get what the CEO needs for his or her board of

Teresa Caro:

directors. We need that definitive proof that when this

Teresa Caro:

goes away, then this will also go away. So why not get the

Teresa Caro:

pieces in place, get the plumbing in place, do the

Teresa Caro:

turning off turning on tests before that actually happens? So

Teresa Caro:

you control the message before the message controls? Yeah.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, how true and it's interesting that you, you

Guy Powell:

bring up the CEO and the board and so the CEO is coming to you

Guy Powell:

and saying, Well what happens If we cut, and if, as the CMO or as

Guy Powell:

the agency, if you don't have the answer that says, yes, let's

Guy Powell:

cut a million dollars out, and we're going to lose 20 million

Guy Powell:

in sales. The CEO needs that argument, because his job is

Guy Powell:

just as much on the line when he goes to the board and says,

Guy Powell:

Well, it, yes, we're going to have to cut somewhere. But if we

Guy Powell:

cut marketing, not only are we going to lose the 20 million,

Guy Powell:

and then to your point as well, we're also going to lose the

Guy Powell:

future. Because you've marketing to not only drive sales in the

Guy Powell:

short term, but you need marketing to drive sales in the

Guy Powell:

future, and cutting off your brand. Investments is a sure way

Guy Powell:

to then cut off that that future that you might have once you

Guy Powell:

come out of that recession. Great. Right. Absolutely. So

Guy Powell:

yeah, great point. So. So now, switching topics just a little

Guy Powell:

bit. So what kind of advice would you give to a female

Guy Powell:

leader?

Teresa Caro:

Oh, wow, do we have a whole other podcast guy?

Guy Powell:

We do we do. We could certainly continue this.

Guy Powell:

But let's, let's go from there and see what we've got.

Teresa Caro:

It's so interesting. Being a female

Teresa Caro:

leader, I so I'm a member of chief, which is a for profit

Teresa Caro:

organization, really focused on bringing curating female leaders

Teresa Caro:

that you have to be an actual certain level of leader for a

Teresa Caro:

certain amount of, of years to be first invited. And then yes,

Teresa Caro:

it's a it's a paid membership, I bring that up. Because

Teresa Caro:

yesterday, we had this great, amazing session around executive

Teresa Caro:

presence. And, and what's fun about this is, is with Zoom, you

Teresa Caro:

get to do, you get to hear the presenter, but then you get to

Teresa Caro:

chat with everybody, to the to the side, and it was really just

Teresa Caro:

an overall great dialogue. And what we were bringing up is how

Teresa Caro:

to be your authentic self of how women are known to talk too

Teresa Caro:

much, or our squeaky voices, or we can't be heard or we're too

Teresa Caro:

defensive, or we were too aggressive. And what she was

Teresa Caro:

recommending is really be your authentic self, which to a

Teresa Caro:

certain point, I agree. But I also because I've spent so much

Teresa Caro:

time in the agency and consulting world. I'm a big

Teresa Caro:

believer of mirroring that person as well. And so why do I

Teresa Caro:

bring up all of these things, it's really this idea of

Teresa Caro:

communication. As a female leader, as any leader,

Teresa Caro:

especially in the agency and consulting space, how you

Teresa Caro:

position yourself, how you hold yourself, how you communicate,

Teresa Caro:

is incredibly important. I don't care if you're male or female,

Teresa Caro:

you can't come across as defensive, I don't care if

Teresa Caro:

you're male or female, female, you can't use crutch words, or

Teresa Caro:

speak too quickly, or use lingo. And really doesn't matter if

Teresa Caro:

you're male or female. If you work for me, I will call it my

Teresa Caro:

taboo session. And all of my employees for past years are now

Teresa Caro:

laughing right now, as they listen to me. We all sit in a

Teresa Caro:

room, they get to pick a topic that they can present on, it

Teresa Caro:

doesn't matter what it is, can be something they're comfortable

Teresa Caro:

with that they enjoy. And then it needs to be one of those. You

Teresa Caro:

know how it works. It's 20 slides five minutes, and the

Teresa Caro:

slides automatically progress. And I get to be the person back

Teresa Caro:

of the room with the taboo. But the moment you start speaking

Teresa Caro:

too quickly, or you're using too many crutch words or lingo, I

Teresa Caro:

buzzed you, and what was really interesting ended up being a

Teresa Caro:

guy, he got so frustrated with me that he was sarcastically

Teresa Caro:

slowing himself down to the point that I stopped it and

Teresa Caro:

said, Okay, now what does everybody think of this guy? And

Teresa Caro:

they said, Wow, he sounds amazing. He sounds so

Teresa Caro:

authoritative. Yes, communication is key. I don't

Teresa Caro:

care if you're female or a male. If you are going to be growing

Teresa Caro:

up in this business as an executive, you need to learn how

Teresa Caro:

to hold yourself, you need to take a position of authority of

Teresa Caro:

competence. The next time I hear a researcher interviewed on NPR,

Teresa Caro:

a female researcher interviewed on NPR about her research and

Teresa Caro:

she says, I think I will explode. Never say I think she

Teresa Caro:

has spent five years doing this research. She knows it is what

Teresa Caro:

it is it says it in the data. And so having that taking that

Teresa Caro:

that position of power is is the number one thing that you can

Teresa Caro:

do. I don't care if you're male or female.

Teresa Caro:

Shifting more to a female perspective. Yes, there are

Teresa Caro:

going to be things that either in reality or in perception,

Teresa Caro:

things like mansplaining and and gaslighting and all of those

Teresa Caro:

kinds of areas and you're going to be frustrated. Come up with

Teresa Caro:

techniques, there's a lot of great articles out there, again,

Teresa Caro:

hiring an executive coach, join a membership and take lessons,

Teresa Caro:

there are techniques that you can use that again, put you in

Teresa Caro:

position of authority, you are going to have that mansplaining

Teresa Caro:

kind of thing or someone who's, who doesn't listen to your idea.

Teresa Caro:

But as soon as the guy says it, there's that perception that

Teresa Caro:

everybody's now listening to him, well use techniques to say,

Teresa Caro:

George, I'm really happy that you shined a spotlight on that

Teresa Caro:

idea that I just talked about, let me even take that a step

Teresa Caro:

further and go back to these points that were saying. So

Teresa Caro:

that's, again, it may be my point number two, but it does

Teresa Caro:

really come back to communication and communication

Teresa Caro:

style. And, and again, not being defensive, but going in with a

Teresa Caro:

position of authority and confidence. And, you know, I

Teresa Caro:

think three is just find your people. Those people can be men,

Teresa Caro:

those people can be women, I have found a lot of great

Teresa Caro:

mentors in men, a lot of great organizations, there's a great

Teresa Caro:

IBM example that I use, that will bring me to my final point

Teresa Caro:

guy on on what to do is around this idea of having confidence

Teresa Caro:

in yourself. I attended an an IBM session once. And IBM is

Teresa Caro:

doing a really great job in cultivating their female

Teresa Caro:

leaders. And one of those leaders, a man tells a story

Teresa Caro:

about how he had a job opening. And it really came down to two

Teresa Caro:

people, a man who had maybe you're enough experience and a

Teresa Caro:

woman that if you looked at if you checked all the boxes, she

Teresa Caro:

checked, every single one of the boxes, and they're both up for

Teresa Caro:

this position. The woman just happened to be part of this,

Teresa Caro:

this cultivating female leaders program. So she had a mentor.

Teresa Caro:

And this leader comes back to the mentor and says, let me

Teresa Caro:

explain to you what just happened. The guy came in and

Teresa Caro:

said, I can do this job here this, here's the skill set I

Teresa Caro:

have how this is how it translate, Uber confident was

Teresa Caro:

all in, he can do it. The woman came in and said, I don't know,

Teresa Caro:

am I ready? Do I really have all the skill set, maybe I need a

Teresa Caro:

couple more years of experience. That happens time and time

Teresa Caro:

again, we we keep saying that we want equal rights that we want

Teresa Caro:

equal opportunity? Well, we are now being given equal

Teresa Caro:

opportunity. And many times because of our imposter

Teresa Caro:

syndrome, our self doubt, we don't take it we don't there's

Teresa Caro:

been females that I have given opportunities to even recently,

Teresa Caro:

and those females didn't take it because they didn't think they

Teresa Caro:

were ready. And that that's an issue. And we really need to

Teresa Caro:

work on that. So she's

Guy Powell:

Yeah, and I, I have seen that. And I unfortunately,

Guy Powell:

I've seen that so many times, where, you know, the so as an

Guy Powell:

example, and this kind of gets outside of marketing, but my

Guy Powell:

son's big into climbing. And he rented this movie and the movie

Guy Powell:

had individuals doing some really interesting climbing

Guy Powell:

feet, you know, a rock wall or a bridge or this or that. And, and

Guy Powell:

the men were just confident and say, well, there's going to be a

Guy Powell:

problem here or problem there. But I think I know how to get

Guy Powell:

around it. And and the women were exactly like you're saying

Guy Powell:

is I don't know if we can do this, you know, they they they

Guy Powell:

often tried it but the first thing out of their mouth was

Guy Powell:

that lack of confidence. And and you know, it's it's not I don't

Guy Powell:

know what causes that but you would you would think that in

Guy Powell:

college or something they were maybe even in high school if

Guy Powell:

somebody has to then you know, have a have a thing that says

Guy Powell:

okay, you know, women, you have to do this, and you have to you

Guy Powell:

have to show confidence. Now the men of course, were faultless,

Guy Powell:

except for all the other faults. And we need the same kind of

Guy Powell:

thing except different. And that's actually a piece that

Guy Powell:

you're talking about. I hate to say it I I think you're right.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, it's it's it unfortunately happens to where you have a

Guy Powell:

woman that is much more qualified and yet they they do

Guy Powell:

have that reticence to say that yes, I'm ready to it. So

Teresa Caro:

Yeah. And that's, that's really what it comes down

Teresa Caro:

to. So if any of your listeners are female, and would like some

Teresa Caro:

mentoring, please reach out to me, you can find me on all the

Teresa Caro:

social medias.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, and I and be honest with you, as part of the

Guy Powell:

AMA the American, the American Marketing Association here in

Guy Powell:

Atlanta. I've been a mentor, I don't know for three or four

Guy Powell:

years now. And I think it's the it's the most fun thing that I

Guy Powell:

do to help young marketers both both male and female. And, and,

Guy Powell:

and that's one of the big things as well. And so, and even, you

Guy Powell:

know, whether it's whether it's your own employees or whether

Guy Powell:

it's Yeah, you know, outsiders like mentees or whatever, you

Guy Powell:

know, I think, you know, helping people to get that confidence

Guy Powell:

that yes, they can do the job and, okay, they may have some

Guy Powell:

doubts on one area. But yes, you know, go for it, go for it, go

Guy Powell:

for it. So,

Teresa Caro:

Right, well and shout out to AMA in the

Teresa Caro:

mentor-mentee program. Shout out to Joanne Harold. She was my

Teresa Caro:

mentor. I was gonna teach myself. I was working on I was

Teresa Caro:

in marketing. So I had figured out that I wanted to do

Teresa Caro:

marketing. And I was at a fax machine. And at that time, AMA

Teresa Caro:

was faxing its announcement, announcements, words

Teresa Caro:

mentor-mentee program, and I right away, I'm a big I was

Teresa Caro:

always been taught to work with mentors. I don't know if it was

Teresa Caro:

something my father taught me or something. And right away, I

Teresa Caro:

signed up for it. And I actually wasn't assigned. Joanne

Teresa Caro:

initially I was given another mentor. And we did this, I think

Teresa Caro:

it was some kind of volunteer event. And we switched because

Teresa Caro:

the guy was with was better with someone else. Joining was better

Teresa Caro:

for me, and I am here today. Because of that, then those

Teresa Caro:

opportunities that Joanne opened me up to and the coaching and

Teresa Caro:

counseling that she has given to me throughout the years.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, yeah, she's, she's definitely a great person

Guy Powell:

to have as a mentor. And congratulations. That's so

Guy Powell:

that's so fantastic that she was able to help you. Wow. So we've

Guy Powell:

talked about kind of the new CMOs and, and what their

Guy Powell:

challenges are. And we've talked about female leaders. There's

Guy Powell:

one other dimension that goes into marketing, and that is the

Guy Powell:

pace of change. And I like to say, you know, it's it's not

Guy Powell:

just that change is happening all the time. It's that

Guy Powell:

accelerated change is now happening all the time, that

Guy Powell:

time between a new technology and a new capability seems to be

Guy Powell:

shortening and shortening. And I think the the good news is that

Guy Powell:

that leaves a lot of opportunity for marketers that can figure

Guy Powell:

out how to use it early on. But, but just staying up with that.

Guy Powell:

So what what do you recommend to the marketing leaders today in

Guy Powell:

terms of how they should handle the disruptive technologies and

Guy Powell:

the new technologies that are that are streaming right in

Guy Powell:

front of them?

Teresa Caro:

Well, I would say, don't panic, just because we're

Teresa Caro:

using the word disruptive doesn't necessarily mean that

Teresa Caro:

it's going to be fast if we think about personally

Teresa Caro:

identifiable information, because I would when you asked

Teresa Caro:

me to answer this question, guys started doing some research on a

Teresa Caro:

lot of the latest technologies out there that are sometimes in

Teresa Caro:

some ways, helping marketers and other ways hurting marketers in

Teresa Caro:

this whole idea of haves and have nots. You know, I reached

Teresa Caro:

out to my CTO about this to see what he was thinking of. And he

Teresa Caro:

brought up ad guard and pie hole and I wasn't going to use the

Teresa Caro:

examples but I liked the opportunity being able to say

Teresa Caro:

pie hole on your podcast, so I love this company name that

Teresa Caro:

company vital. All of you will not forget what it is. But what

Teresa Caro:

it is just before I move on, but these are companies that are

Teresa Caro:

blocking client side, tracking implementations and forcing

Teresa Caro:

companies to go server side it's this whole idea of what does a

Teresa Caro:

third party cookieless future look like? That's become sort of

Teresa Caro:

this tagline. This is something I think kind of dude, people are

Teresa Caro:

gonna think I am so old after listening to podcasts. But do

Teresa Caro:

you remember in 1999, the double click and abacus merger that

Teresa Caro:

happened in 2000 All the lawsuits began. That's when I

Teresa Caro:

started at Razorfish and Razorfish because of the the

Teresa Caro:

drive, so drive PM, Razorfish and a third company that is I'm

Teresa Caro:

forgetting, but really because Dr. pm was so focused on cookie

Teresa Caro:

based tracking, and then you had Razorfish that was focused on

Teresa Caro:

using that tracking, and because of abacus and and double click,

Teresa Caro:

there was a lot of urgency around not connecting PII with

Teresa Caro:

the cookies. Well, you fast forward to today, two decades

Teresa Caro:

later, and that's really what's happening. And it's become so

Teresa Caro:

easy to do that. And with great ease and great, actually results

Teresa Caro:

comes great power, and it is used for nefarious purposes. And

Teresa Caro:

so now the government's having to catch up and put in different

Teresa Caro:

kinds of things like GDPR. Well, GDPR I don't know if you saw the

Teresa Caro:

latest article, but a lot of the GDPR guidelines are going to be

Teresa Caro:

rolled back and there's expected to be a billion pounds savings

Teresa Caro:

for these companies because the amount that's been put on them

Teresa Caro:

so it's just it's two decades now. added to a lot and and

Teresa Caro:

there's a lot to think about and a lot of work to be put in

Teresa Caro:

place, we were going to have complete, no third party

Teresa Caro:

cookies. Thankfully, we got a little bit of a respite there.

Teresa Caro:

But if you think about it, it's really only Google left, a lot

Teresa Caro:

of the others Safari Firefox have already gotten rid of this.

Teresa Caro:

So we say disruption, but there is many times there is a bit of

Teresa Caro:

time to catch up, you just can't wait. Because if you do wait,

Teresa Caro:

then it is going to be sudden, it is going to be expensive. And

Teresa Caro:

it is going to be a wildfire that you're going to need to put

Teresa Caro:

out so don't to to get back to your original question around

Teresa Caro:

what should marketers do? Marketers should be looking out

Teresa Caro:

to the future as much as they can. They should be looking at

Teresa Caro:

the past and saying what can we learn from the past. And then

Teresa Caro:

they should be applying that to the future. An example of past

Teresa Caro:

or future is if you look at Google, when I grew up, and

Teresa Caro:

Google was big search engine optimization all out, I'll go

Teresa Caro:

the rhythms, all organic traffic, that was 100%, of what

Teresa Caro:

they did. And that's still very much in play today. Heck, third

Teresa Caro:

school SEO agencies focused on that. But at one point, Google

Teresa Caro:

realized that they could charge people and they could do paid

Teresa Caro:

advertising. And so then paid became a big part of the

Teresa Caro:

algorithm. Fast forward to Facebook. Well, those of us that

Teresa Caro:

went through the Google could see what was going to happen

Teresa Caro:

with Facebook with Twitter, Pinterest, every time one of

Teresa Caro:

those social media platforms comes out and says they're not

Teresa Caro:

going to do paid. We don't believe them. And so learning

Teresa Caro:

from the past and applying that to the future will help you be

Teresa Caro:

prepared for the future. Seeing that Firefox and Safari have

Teresa Caro:

eliminated cookies and don't have to fact check. I believe

Teresa Caro:

I'm correct on that right guy. That's what Yeah, yeah. So

Teresa Caro:

knowing that they've already done that, doesn't that lead you

Teresa Caro:

to believe that Google's going to be doing the same? And so

Teresa Caro:

thinking about where you're supposed to be going in order to

Teresa Caro:

address that? Don't wait, because what feels like

Teresa Caro:

disruptive isn't necessarily disruptive, you starting to see

Teresa Caro:

the signs COVID, with people wanting to actually order food

Teresa Caro:

and get it delivered to you. Companies had been starting to

Teresa Caro:

prepare for that. And thankfully, thankfully,

Teresa Caro:

companies like churches, had already hired people like Alan

Teresa Caro:

to actually fix that now, Allen's budget went from a nice

Teresa Caro:

to have to Oh, my goodness, fix it now. But can disruptive isn't

Teresa Caro:

as disruptive as we think it is disruptive is only truly

Teresa Caro:

disruptive and equaling urgent, if we let it be that way, we

Teresa Caro:

need to always be looking at the past and figuring out how it

Teresa Caro:

will impact our future.

Guy Powell:

Well, that's an interesting point I and I do

Guy Powell:

like that. But so does that then mean that the marketing leader,

Guy Powell:

the CMO needs to have a function, which is marketing

Guy Powell:

technology. So that someone maybe it's not a full time or

Guy Powell:

maybe it is for a larger brand. But somebody then that is really

Guy Powell:

tracking and making certain that the company is staying up to

Guy Powell:

date with whatever those those changes in technologies are

Guy Powell:

going to be? Well, traditionally,

Teresa Caro:

that's been why agencies still exist. Every time

Teresa Caro:

there's articles going out saying that agencies are going

Teresa Caro:

to go away. I am hesitant to say that that's a good idea. Yes.

Teresa Caro:

Will your partnership with your agency shift? Should agencies so

Teresa Caro:

let's use an agency example. The commoditization of social media,

Teresa Caro:

community management, brands are going to figure out that it's a

Teresa Caro:

lot less expensive to hire a 55 $60,000 resorts to do the day to

Teresa Caro:

day community support for their social media, not hire an

Teresa Caro:

agency. And the agencies from a strategic perspective, need to

Teresa Caro:

be those partners to help prepare the brand's been saying

Teresa Caro:

for several years now how are you? What are the steps you're

Teresa Caro:

taking? In order to prepare for this cookieless future? Let's

Teresa Caro:

get your cars, your first party data all in one place. let's

Teresa Caro:

consolidate your data, your customer data into one

Teresa Caro:

warehouse? Let's start considering CDP's. Let's start

Teresa Caro:

looking at these things. I've been talking about that since

Teresa Caro:

I've been at Atlanta codes because I knew it was coming.

Teresa Caro:

And so let's prepare for it. So we have several years to prepare

Teresa Caro:

for it. Not...okay, it's time and Google's going away and your

Teresa Caro:

advertising that you've been depending on was now out the

Teresa Caro:

window. And so that's where agencies not to be self serving

Teresa Caro:

because I lead an agency but that's where that's what you

Teresa Caro:

should expect your agency partners to do is to be the

Teresa Caro:

person that helps you look across your space, look at

Teresa Caro:

culture and competitors and all those areas. It's also easier

Teresa Caro:

for us to do it because we don't We deal with the same people

Teresa Caro:

every day, we're looking across many different industries, many

Teresa Caro:

different clients. So we actually have the benefit of, of

Teresa Caro:

different things coming to us different questions being asked

Teresa Caro:

different perspectives versus having to do that one set of

Teresa Caro:

things every day.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, interesting. And that is a great point in

Guy Powell:

terms of having the agencies to be the external experts,

Guy Powell:

because, and that's one of the challenges that we have as well.

Guy Powell:

And I'm sure you have it as well as that we can have analysts

Guy Powell:

working for us and and we could then be brought in house or

Guy Powell:

analyze the they could do our work, they could do it in house.

Guy Powell:

But those analysts in House wouldn't get the exposure that

Guy Powell:

the that the agency person would have. Because the agents person

Guy Powell:

just like ours, our our team, they're working across multiple

Guy Powell:

clients across multiple industries and different

Guy Powell:

challenges. And it's that advantage that we bring in

Guy Powell:

certainly for an agency and certainly then for this, this

Guy Powell:

element of, you know, following and tracking technology is

Guy Powell:

definitely something that that that the technologists within

Guy Powell:

the agency can really shine, as opposed to trying to do that

Guy Powell:

internally. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. So we're about

Guy Powell:

towards the end here. And I could we could go on for hours,

Guy Powell:

and always enjoyed talking with you, Theresa. One thing I do

Guy Powell:

want to mention to the audience, my first book, which is over my

Guy Powell:

shoulder right there, Theresa was one of my first editors, my

Guy Powell:

my first beta reader, and she gave some really great advice.

Guy Powell:

And I will never forget that and and I'm always thankful for

Guy Powell:

that. And since that book, I've now written four more. So this

Guy Powell:

last one is my my fifth book on the on marketing. And, and and I

Guy Powell:

think it really is something that that really helps are can

Guy Powell:

help marketers to improve their overall operations and prove

Guy Powell:

them that they're delivering on the success that they have been

Guy Powell:

charged with. So is there anything else that you'd like to

Guy Powell:

mention or any comments that we left off or anything that comes

Guy Powell:

to mind?

Teresa Caro:

So a few things one is, Guy has been a great mentor

Teresa Caro:

and partner to me throughout the years, go ahead and look at that

Teresa Caro:

photo and see when that was and look at my LinkedIn profile. It

Teresa Caro:

was a little itty bitty marketing manager backend back

Teresa Caro:

then, I thought I knew it all. I'm realizing all these years

Teresa Caro:

later, I didn't. But that guy's been someone who has been a

Teresa Caro:

persistent part of my life. And a big part of helping me think

Teresa Caro:

through marketing, return on marketing, investment, all of

Teresa Caro:

those areas. So again, going back to your question about

Teresa Caro:

female leaders in any leader, for that matter, having that

Teresa Caro:

that partner in lots of different areas is is incredibly

Teresa Caro:

important. So that's number one. Number two against again,

Teresa Caro:

pandering to the interviewer, I was able to read guy's book

Teresa Caro:

while I was I was traveling for volleyball this week. And it

Teresa Caro:

will be something that I asked to surprise guys, the analytics

Teresa Caro:

and strategy team, this is going to be required reading and

Teresa Caro:

discussion group. I really love this version of guys book

Teresa Caro:

because of that aspect that we covered quite thoroughly earlier

Teresa Caro:

in this interview around the fact that data isn't just

Teresa Caro:

numbers, data is research, it's insights, it's telling that

Teresa Caro:

story in order to spark creativity, in order to make

Teresa Caro:

sure that when the CEO comes to prove your budget, so she can go

Teresa Caro:

with them back to her board and prove it to the board, making

Teresa Caro:

sure you have those pieces in place. All of those things are

Teresa Caro:

so important. And then my hope is is that at some point, we can

Teresa Caro:

go back and have another discussion guy, I believe you

Teresa Caro:

and I talked a lot about traditional versus digital and

Teresa Caro:

full full funnel to really put a bow on that as we sum things up

Teresa Caro:

for for your listeners is guy and I talked a lot about

Teresa Caro:

agencies and brands and the partnership. We also talked

Teresa Caro:

about people process plumbing, if you are a new leader, do your

Teresa Caro:

best to break down the silos. Traditional is now becoming

Teresa Caro:

digital, full funnel this idea of awareness and perception and

Teresa Caro:

that impact and how it makes them performance based

Teresa Caro:

marketing. We have grown up in these silos and the silos have

Teresa Caro:

gotten worse. And we need to make sure to break down those

Teresa Caro:

silos to truly become integrated. So if there's one

Teresa Caro:

big takeaway coming from this interviews is really looking at

Teresa Caro:

your current organization and see how can you make it more

Teresa Caro:

integrated and more of an integrated approach so you can

Teresa Caro:

set yourself up for success?

Guy Powell:

Yeah, that's a good point and Thank you, and thank

Guy Powell:

you so much for the endorsement, I really appreciate it you've

Guy Powell:

been, you've also been a great person to bounce ideas off of

Guy Powell:

over the years and, and really always appreciate your your

Guy Powell:

input. But to your point, though, about the data silos,

Guy Powell:

one of the things that, that marketing analytics if done,

Guy Powell:

right, and there's a lot of people that don't do it, right,

Guy Powell:

it has to break down the silos, because to your point, it's not

Guy Powell:

just the the consumer data and the consumer research that has a

Guy Powell:

data point or the you know, the the the other activities in the

Guy Powell:

environment that are taking place, but it's also getting

Guy Powell:

data from sales, from marketing, from operations from customer

Guy Powell:

service, whatever it happens to be. And having that clean data

Guy Powell:

across the entire organization is really the best way you can

Guy Powell:

get the the best results so you can really drive the business,

Guy Powell:

the business forward.

Teresa Caro:

I agree wholeheartedly. Well said.

Guy Powell:

Thank you. So yeah, Teresa, thank you so much. I

Guy Powell:

really appreciate it. And with that, let me close so you can

Guy Powell:

find more about the Johnson group at Johnsongroup.com

Guy Powell:

Johnsongroup.com. That's where Teresa is now leading the charge

Guy Powell:

and slaying those dragons. And otherwise, please stay tuned for

Guy Powell:

many other videos in this series of the Backstory on Marketing,

Guy Powell:

please visit marketingmachine. prorelevant.com to download this

Guy Powell:

blog and you can also see it on the popular podcast providers

Guy Powell:

such as Apple, Spotify, and many others. And if you do that,

Guy Powell:

please rate it five stars and I'd really appreciate it

Guy Powell:

otherwise. Thank you and Teresa, thank you so much.

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About the Podcast

The Backstory on Marketing
with Guy Powell
Guy Powell, President of ProRelevant Marketing Solutions, interviews marketing and analytics experts about how the industry is evolving and what data-driven marketers need to succeed today. Find out more about Prorelevant Marketing Solutions at https://prorelevant.com/