Episode 7

Episode 7: Natasha Davis, Impact Branding Consulting

Published on: 9th May, 2022

About Natasha:

Over the past 15 years, Natasha has coached and consulted hundreds of executives and companies on using the power of agility for profitable brand positioning. She is affectionately referred to as “The Chief Visionary” by her clients and business community.

Natasha developed and launched the predictive model CRM tool for consultants, The Profit Enhancer Analysis, in 2019. She was awarded The Lifetime Achievement Award by President Barack Obama in 2016 & appointed as the State of Georgia Small Business Economic Development Leadership Committee member by the National Small Business Association (NSBA) in 2019.

She is a published author, writing about the power of personal branding. Her most recent book is #BeUnleashed: Unleash Your Millionaire Mindset to Build Your Brand.

We discuss the true ROI of branding in this episode of The Backstory on Marketing.

Links:

Natasha Davis Amazon Author Profile 

Nataha Davis Linkedin

Impact Branding Consulting 

Natasha Davis Speaking Website 

Guy's Special Offer

Video of Interview

Transcript
Guy Powell:

Hi, I'm Guy Powell and welcome to the seventh

Guy Powell:

episode of the backstory on marketing. If you haven't

Guy Powell:

already done so please visit pro relevant.com and sign up for all

Guy Powell:

of these episodes and podcasts. I am the author of the upcoming

Guy Powell:

book the post COVID marketing machine. Prepare your team to

Guy Powell:

win. You can find more information on this at marketing

Guy Powell:

machine dot pro relevant.com. Today we'll be speaking with

Guy Powell:

Natasha Davis. She is a brand strategist and visionary. Over

Guy Powell:

the past 15 years she has coached and consulted hundreds

Guy Powell:

of executives and companies on using the power of agility for

Guy Powell:

profitable brand positioning, Natasha became determined to

Guy Powell:

help uncomplicate the most complicated aspects of branding

Guy Powell:

and strategic planning. She is affectionately referred to as

Guy Powell:

the Chief Visionary by her clients and business community.

Guy Powell:

Natasha developed and launched the predictive model CRM tool

Guy Powell:

for consultants to profit enhancer analysis in 2019. She

Guy Powell:

has numerous accolades such as having been awarded as the

Guy Powell:

entrepreneur and executive professional of the 2011 year,

Guy Powell:

excellence in marketing and 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award by

Guy Powell:

President Barack Obama in 2016. And appointed as a state of

Guy Powell:

Georgia, small business economic development leadership committee

Guy Powell:

member by the National Small Business Association in 2019.

Guy Powell:

She's also a published author writing about the power of

Guy Powell:

personal branding. Her most recent book is hashtag be

Guy Powell:

unleashed, unleashed your millionaire mindset to build

Guy Powell:

your brand. Welcome, Natasha.

Unknown:

Thank you so much, guy. Thank you. I appreciate it.

Unknown:

Looking forward to hanging out today.

Guy Powell:

Absolutely. I look forward definitely to talking

Guy Powell:

with you as well. And you've got a great background. So tell us

Guy Powell:

how you got into marketing. What's your backstory on

Guy Powell:

marketing?

Unknown:

Well, you know, I took an untraditional route to where

Unknown:

I am today. I started as a registered nurse, a trauma rule

Unknown:

nurse and I function as a registered nurse in the

Unknown:

emergency room saving lives for many years. And the

Unknown:

entrepreneurship bug came up in Bitney as it had with my father

Unknown:

and my grandmother. So it's in my blood. And I tried to shake

Unknown:

it off, I really did. I tried to shake it off. And like, don't be

Unknown:

ridiculous, you're a registered nurse, you went to school, you

Unknown:

got the student loans to prove it, and the degree so just keep

Unknown:

going. And then I couldn't shake it. And then I realized I was

Unknown:

tapping into certain tools that I didn't realize I had. And so

Unknown:

where it was very natural for me to see something and to, you

Unknown:

know, make a decision about something or to analyze

Unknown:

something around business and around marketing, it was a

Unknown:

little bit more challenging for others. And while working in the

Unknown:

emergency room, I started to dip my toe into entrepreneurship.

Unknown:

And that's where I got sucked in like a vacuum. You know, I

Unknown:

realized, oh, my gosh, I really have something going on. As I

Unknown:

said, I worked in the trauma room. And at the time, there

Unknown:

were medical providers and other other medical professionals that

Unknown:

wanted to start businesses, and they would ask about some

Unknown:

business things and I just rattle off things you're

Unknown:

supposed to do. And they were like, how do you even know this

Unknown:

stuff? I'm like, Well, who doesn't? It's common business

Unknown:

sense, right? Apparently it wasn't. I didn't want it. I

Unknown:

didn't get that. And they started referring to me as the

Unknown:

business nurse in the ER. So when colleagues were saying,

Unknown:

hey, they're trying to do some all you gotta go talk to the

Unknown:

business nurse in the ER, and apparently everybody knew it was

Unknown:

me. And so I realized, Okay, wait a second, there's some time

Unknown:

to transition here. And a few years went forward. And I

Unknown:

realized, hold on, you know, I'm loving this business side. I'm

Unknown:

loving this other me. And I'm starting to not love as much the

Unknown:

nurse side of me. And I started to struggle with that. And I

Unknown:

remember, at one point, I had hit a really difficult place

Unknown:

where I had to choose I had to choose not because it was

Unknown:

mandated upon me, but it was myself inside of myself. I was

Unknown:

no longer happy with what I was doing. And I had to choose to

Unknown:

cross over 100% into business. And I tell you guys, that was

Unknown:

the best decision that I made. It was not an easy decision. It

Unknown:

was hard. And it came with the challenges because as a nurse, I

Unknown:

did not have to market I did not have to go outside and wave and

Unknown:

beg patients to come in. I just sat there and poof, they showed

Unknown:

up. So my Rude Awakening, the reality check happened. My first

Unknown:

full four years in business as a full time entrepreneur. I

Unknown:

remember the first year I was sitting in my office and I was

Unknown:

doing what good business people do. I had the Rolodex on that,

Unknown:

you know, y'all know about Rolodex and y'all know about

Unknown:

that, right? So I had my rolodex, I had an actual office

Unknown:

phone, you know, I had my computer, I had my file cabinet.

Unknown:

Everything was perfect. I had a beautiful clean desk, because

Unknown:

you know, I didn't have anything going on. So why wouldn't my

Unknown:

desk be clean? And I sat there, and I'm wondering, did I pay the

Unknown:

phone bill? Because the phone isn't ringing? Why isn't the

Unknown:

phone ringing? I pick it up, I got a dial tone. I'm on point.

Unknown:

I'm like making sure. And it hit me. Hey, ding dong. If you don't

Unknown:

go tell them you're here. How do they know? And that's when I was

Unknown:

like, Okay, there's a little bit more to being in business than

Unknown:

just looking good in business. And that's when I took on the

Unknown:

the challenge to understand what does it really take to run a

Unknown:

business to get people through the door to keep people in the

Unknown:

door to look respectable out in the business community? And

Unknown:

that's when I sunk my teeth into marketing and into branding.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, absolutely. In branding? Well, marketing is, is

Guy Powell:

critical, that's for sure. And, you know, it's so it's, it's so

Guy Powell:

easy, you know, to think about going into business, but it is

Guy Powell:

so hard to get that first client or the first clients and what

Guy Powell:

have you. And so you've been doing this for a number of

Guy Powell:

years. So let's see, what is the most thing? What is the the best

Guy Powell:

thing that you're most proud of?

Unknown:

Wow, you know, here's the thing, I'm proud of so many

Unknown:

things because I'm I'm I am a Jamaican woman, in an industry

Unknown:

that is not dominated by Jamaican women, to be honest,

Unknown:

right? And so I'm really proud that I made it, you know, I'm

Unknown:

really proud that I made it, I'm proud of all of the businesses,

Unknown:

I've been able to help the business owners, I'm proud of

Unknown:

the companies I've helped, I'm proud of. I'm just proud of me.

Unknown:

And a lot of times business owners don't take a chance to

Unknown:

sit back and just say, be proud of you. Like you've made it. You

Unknown:

know what I mean? You made it through, and you're going

Unknown:

onward. So there's so many things that I am proud of, I'm

Unknown:

always proud of the success that we get for clients. I have a

Unknown:

heart for for my clients. I said we I actually love my clients, I

Unknown:

really do. I love every last one of them, even the ones that give

Unknown:

me extra gray hair. Okay, I love them. So it's one of those

Unknown:

things that I find it hard to always answer what am I most

Unknown:

proud of, but I'm really proud of the effect and the results

Unknown:

that I've been able to bring to the table, being able to package

Unknown:

and use my gifts and deployed in the universe to help other

Unknown:

people. And actually being able to witness that help, you know,

Unknown:

is one of the things that I'm super, super proud of. Yes, it's

Unknown:

always nice to get an award, I was very excited about the

Unknown:

awards. And once I realized I was being awarded with the

Unknown:

Lifetime Achievement Award by President Barack Obama. I was

Unknown:

like, Oh my God. I'm not even 60 or 70 Yet, like you know, and of

Unknown:

course, you know, you step back. And the first thing you think

Unknown:

right guy is how the heck you know, how did that happen?

Unknown:

You're like, am I even like worthy of such a thing? And then

Unknown:

you start thinking, you have to be like, Heck, yeah, I'm worthy

Unknown:

of it. Give me my Lord. So the awards are great. But to me, the

Unknown:

awards are byproducts of all the things that I'm proud of.

Unknown:

Because without those without the the outcomes of results, the

Unknown:

people I've helped the lives I've saved, the companies I've

Unknown:

saved, those awards wouldn't even come to fruition. So the

Unknown:

awards are, like, you know, public recognitions that I'm

Unknown:

proud of like, oh, yeah, this is really cool, you know, but it's

Unknown:

a byproduct. But I'm really proud of the work that I've

Unknown:

done. And being a positive role model and an example for other

Unknown:

people in business, not just not just Caribbean women, but all

Unknown:

people in business men, women, mature, you know, young season

Unknown:

new entrepreneurs, old entrepreneurs, it doesn't matter

Unknown:

just being a positive role model and like a being like, like,

Unknown:

listen, she can do it. Anybody can do it, right?

Guy Powell:

Well, know that know what you can do? I'm sure not

Guy Powell:

everybody can do. That's true.

Unknown:

That is true. I'm very specific. That easy. No, it's

Unknown:

actually not not at all. Not at all. It's not it's not easy at

Unknown:

all. But it's really fun. My father, may he rest in peace was

Unknown:

my best friend. He passed away just about three years ago. He

Unknown:

used to say to me, and it used to just get under my skin. Oh

Unknown:

sweetheart businesses and hard. You're just making it hard. And

Unknown:

I'm like, Would you please stop saying that the phone does not

Unknown:

ring? You know, you know? And he would just say no, honestly

Unknown:

business and my dad was been in business for himself since the

Unknown:

age of 19 until he passed away at 70 years old. And he always

Unknown:

would say we make it complicated businesses and hard. There's

Unknown:

basic principles and you just got to feed the principles and

Unknown:

that thing used to just get under my skin so hard on the

Unknown:

political ones. so easy that How come this is this is happening?

Unknown:

You know, I had the only attitude, but he's absolutely

Unknown:

right, I've come to learn that business actually is not hard.

Unknown:

We complicate it, we put billions of layers and nuances

Unknown:

and corners and curves and turns on basic things. For example, we

Unknown:

take marketing, marketing is a very clear cut simple roadmap to

Unknown:

follow, yet, somehow, society has completely complicated the

Unknown:

whole thing and has added 55 layers plus another 1000. It's

Unknown:

like, it's not that hard, you know, you have a product that

Unknown:

has a price that you need to promote to certain people in a

Unknown:

certain place. That's it. It's simple. Yeah, yeah. That's it

Unknown:

clean roadmap, just figure it out and run with it.

Guy Powell:

You four Ps, I use the four Ps all the time. I

Guy Powell:

mean, somebody people come out with a 10 PS, the 14 days, the

Guy Powell:

12 PS,

Unknown:

I can't I can't even remember that, first of all, and

Unknown:

half of those Ps are duplicates of the first original piece. So

Unknown:

yeah, right. Like, let's not reinvent the wheel, I actually

Unknown:

love traditional just can traditional marketing and

Unknown:

business principles. Now, there obviously, is times that you

Unknown:

have to use, you know, contemporary, but I actually am

Unknown:

an old soul, I do not believe in 100% contemporary methodology, I

Unknown:

believe that there is a very healthy blend of traditional and

Unknown:

contemporary, but I also believe that you cannot have successful

Unknown:

contemporary business approaches, marketing and

Unknown:

branding without understanding traditional.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, you know, and let me go back to a point that

Guy Powell:

you made I really liked this, is that where you said, you know, I

Guy Powell:

love my clients. And, you know, I think marketers also need to

Guy Powell:

love their customers. You know, and companies, you know, as, you

Guy Powell:

know, how many times and I hate to say it, I'm guilty of it, you

Guy Powell:

know, I, I love my clients and I hate my clients at the same

Guy Powell:

time. Sometimes. It is it is them and their challenges and

Guy Powell:

understanding their challenges that I think, you know, really

Guy Powell:

makes a difference as an as an external consultant, just like

Guy Powell:

what you're doing. And, you know, it really does, if you

Guy Powell:

can, you know, take to heart what they're going through and

Guy Powell:

what they need to do to be successful in the marketplace.

Guy Powell:

It really, really makes a difference.

Unknown:

It really does. I think that we we as business persons

Unknown:

and even even as an expert, right, you're you stand in a

Unknown:

subject matter expertise, arena, you don't stand to say I know

Unknown:

everything. So even as a subject matter expert, I still need to

Unknown:

lend my my ear, and I have to lean on other experts, because

Unknown:

you don't know everything is one person. So when when I approach

Unknown:

a business, and they say listen, we need help. Here's the reality

Unknown:

of it. It is the hardest thing to admit, as a business owner,

Unknown:

I'm not doing something right. I'm failing the business, I'm

Unknown:

failing the mission. I'm hurting the clients because I'm hurting

Unknown:

my team. It is the hardest thing to admit, right that I'm messing

Unknown:

this up, I'm really messing this up and then to go get the help.

Unknown:

So once a consultant comes to the to the table, the consultant

Unknown:

is there really to support and so we know that if the company

Unknown:

didn't have an issue, a challenge or a need, we wouldn't

Unknown:

even be there. Right? And so when that when they come with

Unknown:

all their their luggage, I call it a little seven piece Louie

Unknown:

baton set when they come with their seven piece Louis Vuitton

Unknown:

set that's fully packed, and they hand it off and say thank

Unknown:

you take it, they they hit a brick wall. They don't know what

Unknown:

else to do. And it is us as consultants that have to learn

Unknown:

how to do what we need to mobilize that seven piece Louis

Unknown:

baton set and how do we do that with our skills and our

Unknown:

expertise? Okay, well, let me go get this person and grab that

Unknown:

suitcase, you grab those two suitcase because you know, you

Unknown:

do that. That's what we're there to do. So they every client

Unknown:

comes with past issues. And also perceptions that are completely

Unknown:

wrong. Like, I love it when people say I don't understand

Unknown:

why you have to post on social media several times a day. Why

Unknown:

can't we just get away with three times a week? Okay, let me

Unknown:

explain some things to you. Right? Or I love it when you

Unknown:

when they say after 30 days, how come none of the marketing is

Unknown:

working? I expected this and this should have been happening

Unknown:

right? We should have had a 10x by now. Okay, let me explain to

Unknown:

you how this actually works as opposed to what you saw on

Unknown:

Google. You know, let's look that up. So it's sometimes it's

Unknown:

it's just displaced perception and understanding. And as a

Unknown:

consultant, you have to be able to educate. That's another thing

Unknown:

as a consultant we have to educate. We're not there just to

Unknown:

show up right? We have to educate in our area of

Unknown:

expertise, but also as a consultant. truly loving your

Unknown:

client also means knowing when it's time to cut them off, or

Unknown:

when it's Time to get someone else on the team. That's what

Unknown:

truly loving your clients mean as well. Because sometimes you

Unknown:

got to learn when to cut the umbilical cord but like, Okay,

Unknown:

you're gonna fly because you've added seven more pieces to your

Unknown:

existence seven piece Louis baton set, and we're not

Unknown:

carrying it. So we love you so much, we're gonna let you be

Guy Powell:

you Yeah, that is very true. And and that's a

Guy Powell:

tough as a consultant, it's always tough to find that time

Guy Powell:

to let go. And but nevertheless, you know, if you've taught them

Guy Powell:

right, and you've given them kind of the infrastructure that

Guy Powell:

they need, then they should be able to fly on their own and,

Guy Powell:

and that actually is also a moment when you can really say

Guy Powell:

we have succeeded in doing in doing something valuable so that

Guy Powell:

they can, you know, actually, you know, move further and

Guy Powell:

potentially even faster. So,

Unknown:

agreed, agreed. I think just like with marketing, if you

Unknown:

have a marketing strategy we have what we're starting with

Unknown:

and what we want at the end, right? As consultants, you still

Unknown:

as you are marketing as a consultant, or you are putting

Unknown:

marketing plans, we still have to also know there's a beginning

Unknown:

and there's an end, right? Sometimes consultants come in

Unknown:

with a mindset like this indefinite mindset. No, you want

Unknown:

to have a start time and an end time. And at some point, if as

Unknown:

long as you know, there will come an end. Just like in

Unknown:

marketing, we have to we have a start, we're trying to achieve

Unknown:

something when we achieve it, we'd hit the goal. We have to

Unknown:

know when it's time to let go, as opposed to holding on to

Unknown:

clients long past when it's time for them to be free.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, absolutely. So tell us about impact brand

Guy Powell:

consulting, what what kind of clients do you have? And what

Guy Powell:

kind of problems do you typically run into?

Unknown:

So impact branding, works primarily with healthcare

Unknown:

works in the healthcare industry, we do a work with

Unknown:

government agencies, local city, we also do, you know, federal,

Unknown:

we work with service professionals, other

Unknown:

consultants, other service providers, we do some work with

Unknown:

product based companies, but primarily service based

Unknown:

businesses, and are in logistics, also certificate

Unknown:

Trucking, we do logistics. So the type of problems or I don't

Unknown:

want to say problems, the pain that our clientele typically

Unknown:

experience is, I know there's something wrong, but I can't put

Unknown:

my finger on it. And it has to be fixed. That's usually that's

Unknown:

usually what happens. Like, I've been three o'clock in the

Unknown:

morning and two o'clock in the morning, I am awake, stressing

Unknown:

because something's wrong. And I don't know what's wrong. And

Unknown:

I've thrown everything plus the kitchen sink at it, trying to

Unknown:

fix it, and it won't fix other problems or challenges that

Unknown:

clients have come to come to us with is we have had this

Unknown:

strategic plan that we wanted to roll out, and it never rolls

Unknown:

out. We don't know why we start the year fired up ready to roll.

Unknown:

And by the time we get to the third month of the year, is like

Unknown:

we forgot where we started. And by the time we get to the end of

Unknown:

the year, we are back where we started. And this has been a

Unknown:

vicious cycle. So we tend to get people that are in a place where

Unknown:

they are looking for enhanced performance and efficiency. And

Unknown:

they have not been able to accomplish that for whatever

Unknown:

reason, and they're looking for some fresh eyes, they're looking

Unknown:

for outside view to come with a strategic lens, so that we can

Unknown:

go ahead and close that gap in order for them to see the

Unknown:

performance and efficiency they're looking

Guy Powell:

for. Yeah, I think and that makes a lot of sense,

Guy Powell:

too. I think, you know, even for myself, you know, you put

Guy Powell:

together a plan for the year. And and it is it is hard. I

Guy Powell:

mean, you know, you get stuck on doing the day to day things and,

Guy Powell:

and you know, we're kind of in the same in a similar business,

Guy Powell:

and we have clients as well and you get, you know, kind of

Guy Powell:

bogged down in what they need. And then it's very easy to put

Guy Powell:

off and put off what you need to do on business. And it is nice

Guy Powell:

to bring in an outsider, it sounds like in your case, you

Guy Powell:

know, just help to get past that and but not only get past it,

Guy Powell:

but really identify, you know, some of the obstacles and

Guy Powell:

challenges so that you can help them to more easily, you know,

Guy Powell:

get past that and then accelerate and enhance their

Guy Powell:

overall business.

Unknown:

Right. Here's one of the things too. I tell you, when

Unknown:

we come to the point where someone's like, we need help, I

Unknown:

always reaffirm our clients, there's nothing You're not

Unknown:

stupid, you're not a bad person. You just this is not your

Unknown:

wheelhouse and it's okay to get help. There is a there is a

Unknown:

significant difference

Unknown:

between

Unknown:

writing the plan and implementing the plan. And I

Unknown:

usually have two two sides of the table. I either have people

Unknown:

that have been able to write very elaborate, beautiful plans.

Unknown:

They are very sexy, very sexy, but when you look at it, it's

Unknown:

missing substance, and it also had never gets implemented. Then

Unknown:

I also have another end of the spectrum where people are

Unknown:

implementing, implementing all the time without a plan. That is

Unknown:

a perfect recipe for madness. Because there's no destination,

Unknown:

we don't know where we're going. We don't know how we're getting

Unknown:

there. We don't know how we measure if we're in the right

Unknown:

place, is, it's the same thing as getting up in the car and

Unknown:

just hitting the road and just going and someone's saying,

Unknown:

Where are we going? Oh, I don't know, we're just going I know,

Unknown:

but where we're going up there, but where, and then you make all

Unknown:

the stops. With with the price of fuel, you're burning through

Unknown:

fuel. It's like, you don't know where you're going. So I end up

Unknown:

getting people on two ends. And here, here's the, here's the

Unknown:

thing that I can say, because it's true. The hardest clients

Unknown:

are the ones that implement without a plan, they are the

Unknown:

hardest group to get back on track. Because most people that

Unknown:

implement without a plan, they know they need a plan. But

Unknown:

they've convinced themselves that they don't need to stop,

Unknown:

develop the plan first, then implement, they think that they

Unknown:

can plan upon and implement at the same time, and you really

Unknown:

can't do that. So those are my more challenging clients, the

Unknown:

ones that implement without a plan, it's kind of like shooting

Unknown:

from the hip, you know, they're trying to create this microwave

Unknown:

thing. So it's very important that even in marketing, I mean,

Unknown:

even as something as basic as we want to increase our customer

Unknown:

acquisition by 10%. Perfect, how, how and why those are

Unknown:

questions, we have to ask ourselves, right, how and why.

Unknown:

And then when we go through our keys, okay, what's the product?

Unknown:

Who are the people? What's going to be the price? What's going to

Unknown:

be the place, right? How are we going to promote it, we have to

Unknown:

go through that. Because then otherwise, we're going to be

Unknown:

doing things haphazardly. So when we know what we're doing.

Unknown:

And he's okay, the way we're going to do our 10% acquisition,

Unknown:

increase of clientele is we're going to do 123, stop, we're

Unknown:

going to do 123 consistently. The people that tend to do the

Unknown:

planning without the web, do the implementing without planning

Unknown:

don't do anything consistent, like one hit wonders, right?

Unknown:

They show up, they disappear, they show up, they disappeared

Unknown:

and make a post. They send a mailer, they do a event, and

Unknown:

then they just keep it moved. Oh, that didn't work. That

Unknown:

didn't work. Let's go try something else. And you're like,

Unknown:

Well, you didn't even land yet. Like, wait a second, like, let's

Unknown:

make sure. Like, did we even go back to see why it didn't work?

Unknown:

Because then what will happen is you'll repeat, you become a

Unknown:

vicious cycle, you repeat the same thing. And what do they

Unknown:

always say? Doing the same thing over and over again, expecting

Unknown:

something different? Is insanity is madness. Right?

Guy Powell:

Absolutely. And to your point, you know, when they

Guy Powell:

The other thing that I found too, is that, you know, hey, we

Guy Powell:

did that, we did that. And then we did that two years ago, and

Guy Powell:

it didn't work. We didn't, you know, and then all of a sudden,

Guy Powell:

you know, all of that. And you know that execution and

Guy Powell:

implementation and just consistently building upon what

Guy Powell:

you're trying to do. And, and in that respect, really helping

Guy Powell:

them to build their brand, and helping them to be consistent in

Guy Powell:

how they build it and consistent with the customers that they're

Guy Powell:

trying to target. And, and that I think that's that's really

Guy Powell:

hard. A lot of, you know, a lot of businesses don't, you know,

Guy Powell:

they do they do want to just jump from one thing to the next

Guy Powell:

because it didn't work within the first you know, three days

Guy Powell:

or three months, right?

Unknown:

You're right. It's like, oh, that didn't work next.

Unknown:

It's like, no, wait a second. You know, I and that's why I

Unknown:

said I love traditional business methodologies and traditional

Unknown:

marketing blended with contemporary because back in the

Unknown:

day, right guy businesses knew how to make you know, they had

Unknown:

staying power, they knew that it took time they knew, listen, if

Unknown:

you want me to address 100,000 people and get their loyal

Unknown:

attention, that is not going to happen in three days, three

Unknown:

months at all, you know, they had staying power. And the

Unknown:

problem they didn't have why the ones that disappeared that

Unknown:

should still be here is they didn't have vision for the

Unknown:

future. They started lacking future vision. They just thought

Unknown:

we're stuck. And that's where complacency becomes the great

Unknown:

demise, right? Because now we get complacent. So I do believe

Unknown:

in meant mixing traditional and contemporary and being very

Unknown:

clear about how you're going to make the appropriate adjustments

Unknown:

at the right time. So we have to monitor things pay attention to

Unknown:

it. If it's not working. Let's see why. And I went and that's

Unknown:

perfect. I've had that response before. We did that already. Oh,

Unknown:

great. So tell me how did you do it? And what part of it did not

Unknown:

work? Well, it just didn't work. No, no, I get that. I totally

Unknown:

get that. But I'd like to know specifically what about it

Unknown:

didn't work. because it don't tell me the whole thing didn't

Unknown:

work. That means that they never tracked it. And so that's where

Unknown:

education comes in. The only way you can say something did not

Unknown:

work, is that you did everything right about it. And it did not

Unknown:

work. And that's what we find, right? We'll find, oh, that

Unknown:

didn't work. Because, you know, email doesn't work anymore.

Unknown:

Okay. Well, let me see. Let me see your stats. Let me see what

Unknown:

you did. Okay. You did one email every six months. Yeah. And you

Unknown:

said it didn't work. So how did you have your strategy strategy

Unknown:

said you are going to do an email a month for 12 consecutive

Unknown:

months. And you were going to do this, this and this. But based

Unknown:

on the stats of this campaign, you did two emails, one every

Unknown:

six months. So how is it that it's not working? What no one

Unknown:

opened? Uh huh. Okay, let's educate you on how this thing

Unknown:

works.

Guy Powell:

Right? Well, you know, you're right about the,

Guy Powell:

the measurement piece and how important that is, and the

Guy Powell:

tracking and making sure that, you know, you do the email, and

Guy Powell:

then what happened, then diagnose what went wrong and

Guy Powell:

what what went, right. So I'm on the, you know, as you know, I'm

Guy Powell:

on the ROI side. And, and that's, that is critical, you

Guy Powell:

know, to be able to make sure that your numbers and your

Guy Powell:

tracking is done, so that you can really see whether there has

Guy Powell:

been an effect. And to your point, you know, so many people

Guy Powell:

don't want to wait long enough to see that it's working. You

Guy Powell:

know, you've got this plan, we had the plan, and then you know,

Guy Powell:

not to follow it or not to follow it long enough is, is

Guy Powell:

pretty critical.

Unknown:

It is it is you know, in law, they say words matter

Unknown:

and marketing. They say numbers matter. numbers matter. It

Unknown:

matters. How many emails did we do, how many opens did we did?

Unknown:

How many posts did we do? What time of day? How many people

Unknown:

saw? I mean, we have to really go down the line. Even direct

Unknown:

mail, you know, we did a direct mail. Okay, great. It didn't

Unknown:

work. Okay. How many mailers did you send? Well, we sent one, we

Unknown:

sent it to 100,000. People. Oh, okay. And, and what were you

Unknown:

expecting to happen after that? So it's always interested in

Unknown:

numbers matter. So building the numbers pre, as you know,

Unknown:

projected and then tracking the actuals. It's really important.

Unknown:

And some people get nervous around this right guy, they get

Unknown:

nervous. They're like, Oh, my God, that's too much. That's

Unknown:

numbers and spreadsheets, and not the mathematics and all that

Unknown:

stuff. Actually, just like dad said, business isn't hard. We

Unknown:

just overcomplicated. Yeah, yeah, basic business principles.

Unknown:

Right. Money in money out?

Guy Powell:

Absolutely. And I will admit, there is, for some

Guy Powell:

reason, there is sometimes a fear of the spreadsheet, but I

Guy Powell:

think that's going I think it's getting less, I've been

Guy Powell:

surprised that people that actually, I wouldn't have

Guy Powell:

thought they know how to really wield a spreadsheet, and they're

Guy Powell:

just whipping through stuff. But I think I think, to your earlier

Guy Powell:

point, I think it's more of a kind of a staying power and not

Guy Powell:

just doing one email and expecting that blast to get you

Guy Powell:

something. It's that consistent kind of brand building and

Guy Powell:

brand, you know, getting getting your face in front of their

Guy Powell:

clients so that you can be seen and be remembered. And then all

Guy Powell:

of a sudden, you know, they go Yeah, you know, I do have a need

Guy Powell:

for that. And let me give them a call or let me respond to this.

Unknown:

Right. Exactly. Exactly. And you know, to your

Unknown:

point. There was a big company, they were doing a massive event.

Unknown:

And they just thought because we're a big company, we can just

Unknown:

show up and is that we have to do anything. And after probably

Unknown:

about just under a million dollars in marketing, they had

Unknown:

to pull back. It's like something's not right. We're not

Unknown:

we're this is not working. How could this be? We're this big,

Unknown:

amazing company, how could this be and they had to pull back.

Unknown:

And what happened is they were choosing to enter into a new

Unknown:

territory. They didn't have brand recognition, let alone

Unknown:

brand loyalty. So when we talk about branding and positioning

Unknown:

and marketing and tying it together, the first thing we

Unknown:

always have to remember is that before a brand can earn loyalty,

Unknown:

there has to be a place of awareness. If I'm aware of you

Unknown:

and aware of your brand, then I will recognize you when you

Unknown:

begin to show up. If I can recognize you, then I can patron

Unknown:

you I can use you. If I use you. And I like you then you you I'll

Unknown:

start shifting to a place of preference, because I'll prefer

Unknown:

you over the other and then there will come a point then I

Unknown:

can go ahead and give you my loyalty right. So we look at

Unknown:

branding, a lot of people or smaller businesses, medium sized

Unknown:

companies and every once in a while a large company, they try

Unknown:

to jump from brand zero to brand loyalty like that, and it does

Unknown:

not happen because loyalty can never be achieved. until we at

Unknown:

least reached a point of patronage or usage. That's it,

Unknown:

because it's not the point of usage that you either like or

Unknown:

dislike them. And then we can start shifting down. So that's

Unknown:

one thing that's really important. And that's that stay

Unknown:

in power, right? That's like, looking at the companies that

Unknown:

were here. And, you know, now they're gone, like the Buster

Unknown:

Browns of the world, and Woolworths and, you know, all

Unknown:

that stuff they had, they understood what that meant. So,

Unknown:

understanding of the journey and not being afraid of the process,

Unknown:

and always say, we have to learn how to respect the process, we

Unknown:

have to respect the process, right? And then we'll get there

Unknown:

quicker and save some money while we're doing it.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, absolutely. And I, you know, and I like your

Guy Powell:

point, you know, that concept of the leaky bucket, you got, you

Guy Powell:

know, marketing, maybe it's bringing in new clients, but

Guy Powell:

they're leaking out the bottom, we were working with a big

Guy Powell:

insurance company, and they had almost a 40% loss rate in the

Guy Powell:

year of their customers 40%, you know, that would be, you have to

Guy Powell:

change that by a couple of percent. And you can figure you

Guy Powell:

know, your revenue growth is met, you know, what are you

Guy Powell:

doing wrong, and then being able to really figure that out, and

Guy Powell:

then make some changes to it. I also, like your point about, you

Guy Powell:

know, diagnosing what's wrong, what sometimes, you know, if you

Guy Powell:

do a number of different marketing things, some things

Guy Powell:

work, and some things don't and, and I'm the ROI guy. So I that's

Guy Powell:

kind of the first thing I look at, well, what's working and

Guy Powell:

what's not. But the second real pieces, well, it's may not be

Guy Powell:

working, but maybe you're doing something wrong there.

Unknown:

You're not doing the process, you're not following

Unknown:

the process. Right. I love it. Yeah. And that's usually what we

Unknown:

find, though, right guy, like, we usually find that every once

Unknown:

in a while, we'll find that you're right, this isn't

Unknown:

working, it's not working, because it's not for your

Unknown:

industry. It doesn't match your business, it doesn't match your

Unknown:

clientele. I always find that sometimes people don't know

Unknown:

their clientele, they don't know who their their audience is. And

Unknown:

so they're, they're using any method to talk to their

Unknown:

audience, but they don't know who the audience is. So they

Unknown:

can't hit a target. There's no target. They don't know what

Unknown:

they're doing. So they're trying anything. And so there is a

Unknown:

method for every industry and for every business, it just has

Unknown:

to be perfectly and specifically prescribed. And that's what we

Unknown:

find. And you know that you know, you hear mailers don't

Unknown:

work, email doesn't work, email is dead, social media doesn't

Unknown:

work, this doesn't a third, advertising doesn't work. This

Unknown:

doesn't work. That doesn't work. Well, it may be it may not work

Unknown:

for your industry, or maybe your type of business at the stage

Unknown:

your businesses, but it does work. So how about we find

Unknown:

something that actually will work for you that you can stick

Unknown:

with. Another thing is some people try to use marketing

Unknown:

strategies and brand well, not even brand positioning, but

Unknown:

marketing strategies to position their brand without counting the

Unknown:

costs. Certain marketing strategies costs way more money.

Unknown:

And it requires a certain level of manpower. So you have a

Unknown:

business that maybe they only have a team of 10, and maybe

Unknown:

their marketing budget capped at 50,000 for the year, but they

Unknown:

want to step into territory where this marketing strategy

Unknown:

would require you to have a team of 50. And you would have to

Unknown:

have a marketing budget of 200,000. You're right. It's not

Unknown:

going to work.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, absolutely. And in that case, what you're

Guy Powell:

doing is you're generating demand for your cut your

Guy Powell:

competitors, because they're

Unknown:

generating demand for your customers. I love it.

Guy Powell:

Yeah. And but you can't fulfill it, you know, you

Guy Powell:

can't answer the phone, or you can't do whatever it is, and

Guy Powell:

they're just gonna call somebody else. So you just wasted all

Guy Powell:

that money and, and you hope your competitors do better.

Unknown:

I love that as a good one to generating demand for

Unknown:

your customers. I used to say you're negotiating against

Unknown:

yourself, but that one sounds even sexier. You're generating

Unknown:

demand for your customers, your competitors, I should say.

Guy Powell:

Exactly. Although, you know, it's funny, and I'm so

Guy Powell:

glad to hear, you know, you'd like a mix of contemporary

Guy Powell:

versus traditional media. We've seen in with some of our clients

Guy Powell:

kind of a resurgence of some of the traditional media. And I

Guy Powell:

think that's because they're just getting overwhelmed with

Guy Powell:

all these messages. And then everybody is ignoring like

Guy Powell:

print, you know, or billboards, because they're just not using

Guy Powell:

them anymore. And now you put something up there, and all of a

Guy Powell:

sudden they start to really work so

Unknown:

quickly. Exactly. Well, you know, here's the other

Unknown:

thing, too. Anything that's new is always exciting, right? And

Unknown:

so many years ago, social media hit the scene, right? So social

Unknown:

media showed up and hit the scene. And that was the new and

Unknown:

exciting, hoo rah thing of the business time and everything

Unknown:

right like that, right? But what happened is, it's technology.

Unknown:

It's technology. So the technology has to keep up with

Unknown:

the times And so when we have different social media

Unknown:

platforms, the technology has to significantly advance, which

Unknown:

means that it's ever changing. So between once you finally

Unknown:

figure out an algorithm for one platform, within a year or so

Unknown:

that whole entire algorithm and the process is changed, it

Unknown:

completely changes. And then you have to figure out how this

Unknown:

works and how that works. Right? So we have been in this this

Unknown:

space where we have been exposed to social media since like, what

Unknown:

the to 2000, or something like that. So we've been exposed to,

Unknown:

you know, early 2000s, that we have had this social media rave,

Unknown:

right? So we have to

Unknown:

now look at how could the

Unknown:

platform that we were exposed to in like 2004 and 2006 function

Unknown:

the same way, 1820 years later, it can't. And so when we look at

Unknown:

a business, if you don't evolve with the times as well, this is

Unknown:

where businesses are getting stuck. They think, well, I'm

Unknown:

old, this happened when social media kicked in, and they

Unknown:

thought everybody was going to be on social media, you had a

Unknown:

bucket of businesses that were adamant, we're not going on

Unknown:

social media, we don't need it. We'll continue to do our door

Unknown:

hangers, and we'll send mailers and they didn't even do email,

Unknown:

we'll put it in a in a newspaper. That's what we're

Unknown:

gonna do. That's, that's how we got here. That's how we

Unknown:

succeeded, then that's how you succeeded, then in order to

Unknown:

stay, you have to evolve with it. So when 2004 and six and

Unknown:

eight kicked in, and all these platforms, and after that, I

Unknown:

mean, they just popped up every three, three or three seconds,

Unknown:

another one pops up, you have to figure out okay, we do have to

Unknown:

align with a platform. Which one? Or which two of them? Are

Unknown:

we going to align with? Most people get themselves into a

Unknown:

tizzy? Because they think they have to be on every single

Unknown:

social media platform, when that's really impossible,

Unknown:

because there's well over 300 plus social media platforms.

Unknown:

More than that, now, there's no way you can be on all of them.

Unknown:

Right? So a business has to step back, right. from a strategic

Unknown:

standpoint, where are our customers? So that's why it's

Unknown:

important, I got to know my customer first, because then

Unknown:

I'll know what platform we need to be on.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, absolutely. And I think to one

Guy Powell:

of the things that companies don't realize, as well as those

Guy Powell:

platforms evolve, in two ways, one of them the technology

Guy Powell:

underlying it evolves, and then there's new like tools and how

Guy Powell:

to use it, and what have you. And, you know, we cookies came

Guy Powell:

about, and then now their cookies are going away, but

Guy Powell:

there's new tools to be able to get around that. And the second

Guy Powell:

thing is, though, I think there is, with any of these new

Guy Powell:

platforms, there is a first mover advantage, if it's really

Guy Powell:

you know, like, let's say, let's say your audiences on tick tock,

Guy Powell:

if your first person or the first company in your

Guy Powell:

competitive set to be on tick tock, you're gonna get really

Guy Powell:

great results out of that. But as soon as the competition gets

Guy Powell:

in there, then you know, now you're fighting again. So now

Guy Powell:

you have to do something different. And there's, you

Guy Powell:

know, those two dimensions of the dynamics, and each one's of

Guy Powell:

the in each one of these platforms is really, really

Guy Powell:

critical. And so then when somebody says, well, we've been

Guy Powell:

doing print for the last 30 years, or door hangers, or bus

Guy Powell:

wrappers or something like that, and it's always worked for us.

Guy Powell:

But you know, life has changed, you know, there's new ways to do

Guy Powell:

this kind of stuff.

Unknown:

You're right, well, and they say, it always worked for

Unknown:

us. And then you say, Okay, let's look at some numbers. It's

Unknown:

always worked for you. But over the past five years, you've lost

Unknown:

30 something percent of your customer base. Yeah, he didn't

Unknown:

realize it. Right. So that's to your point, you know, knowing

Unknown:

the numbers understanding where we are, I'd like I always like

Unknown:

to know, where are we? Where are we going? How are we going to

Unknown:

get there? And who do we need to get there? Right, who do we

Unknown:

need? And how much is this going to cost us? You know, how are we

Unknown:

going to be able to start something stabilize something

Unknown:

and and then scale it? Right? And that's that's the whole

Unknown:

essence of business. So I agree with you 100%, knowing where you

Unknown:

need to be and at what time and then also, knowing when to exit

Unknown:

stage left? Yeah, yeah, leave it like if you're on a platform,

Unknown:

and it's become oversaturated. And you find out that your

Unknown:

customers have shifted, you got to shift with your customers.

Unknown:

That's where they are. You can I always say, don't keep asking

Unknown:

the island to uproot and come to you, you need to go to the

Unknown:

island.

Guy Powell:

Yep. How true how true, how true. So we all are,

Guy Powell:

hopefully, hopefully, hopefully now emerging out of COVID. What

Guy Powell:

have you kind of learned now that we're kind of coming out or

Guy Powell:

what are you seeing now that we're coming out that will be a

Guy Powell:

really good advantage to help your clients with?

Unknown:

Well, there are a lot of different things that have

Unknown:

emerged so far. example, I'll try to be somewhat specific to

Unknown:

give some hard examples, right. So for our clients, one of the

Unknown:

things we notify notice with our restaurant clients, because we

Unknown:

had a fair amount of restaurant clients, is we had to completely

Unknown:

shift and change the entire business model. One thing we did

Unknown:

with all our clients, when COVID hit, the first thing we did was

Unknown:

notify them, we have to have an emergency meeting, because you

Unknown:

need to change your entire business model. We Yes, we had

Unknown:

our plan that we mapped out, but it's a completely different

Unknown:

world. So now we have to go back and adjust the strategic plan

Unknown:

and just the business model. And what we did with even, for

Unknown:

example, our restaurant clients, we had to completely change the

Unknown:

business model, you're not going to have the same capacity in

Unknown:

house. And so really looking at ramping up the takeout ramping

Unknown:

up outdoor space, but then also what do you have to do when you

Unknown:

start doing that your technology, adjusting your, your

Unknown:

manpower, the numbers, because now you don't have the same in

Unknown:

house, you're gonna have to remove at least five of the

Unknown:

tables, because here's what will happen. If you leave the tables

Unknown:

packed in here, the way it is, you're going to lose more

Unknown:

customers because some people are not going to come because

Unknown:

it's too close. Now you've got now we have to start accounted

Unknown:

for social distance and spacing. So now where you might have had

Unknown:

10 tables in this one particular area, you can only get five.

Unknown:

Those are some changes that have come down for our clients. Some

Unknown:

other things that we've come down to technology has been a

Unknown:

bit thing, we've had to redo all the financial projections,

Unknown:

because the cost of technology is significantly changing. And

Unknown:

it's probably going to keep changing for another two years,

Unknown:

until things begin to kind of settle a little bit. So we had

Unknown:

to make sure our clients could account for the change in the

Unknown:

cost of technology to operate the business across the board,

Unknown:

even just to the economic rise of things, right. And then also

Unknown:

standing back and looking at how people work. So when we have

Unknown:

people that have to work inside, we have to start looking at

Unknown:

okay, does your staff have to be in the building? And do you

Unknown:

actually need this building? Because some people are holding

Unknown:

on to it like, oh, what's coming back? It's coming back. I wish I

Unknown:

wish, I wish no, no, it's not coming back starting to change.

Unknown:

There's no need to have this large space and building when

Unknown:

90% of the time it's empty. So making those hard adjustments

Unknown:

are some things as well, that needed to be done. In terms of

Unknown:

servicing clientele. Two things have to happen. Speed and

Unknown:

technology. Customers now are not as a weight from their

Unknown:

devices. So when a customer or a client reaches out, it's not

Unknown:

okay that it takes you two and three days to get back to them.

Guy Powell:

Not okay. Yeah, yeah. Yeah.

Unknown:

Okay. Before it was okay. Because they were on the

Unknown:

street. They were moving around and everything's new. Not

Unknown:

anymore.

Guy Powell:

wasn't okay. It was marginally okay. But you have to

Guy Powell:

respond immediately. You really?

Unknown:

Yeah, you got you got 10 hours. I've not heard from

Unknown:

you all month. I just spoke to you two days ago. It feels like

Unknown:

a month. So communication. You know, policies had to be

Unknown:

changed. How do you how do you communicate things of that

Unknown:

nature, you can't, you cannot wait two and three and four days

Unknown:

to respond to a client. Another thing is because technology

Unknown:

shifted, we had to really incorporate a policy, you must

Unknown:

check your your junk folder, you have to check your junk folder,

Unknown:

the way that our technology, the half of our emails get sucked

Unknown:

into junk folder, which never used to go there before. So now,

Unknown:

you can't not check it, your spam folder, your junk folder

Unknown:

has to be checked on a regular routine basis to sometimes to

Unknown:

two times a day, three times a day, depending on the volume you

Unknown:

have. So those are some things like really going for, like

Unknown:

infrastructure place and how an operations is what we've spent a

Unknown:

lot of time this is what's turning and what's changing.

Unknown:

Thanks to COVID

Guy Powell:

Yeah, well, you know, it's there's a really good

Guy Powell:

case study with, with Chick fil A and, and what they've been

Guy Powell:

able to do I what a what a, what a company.

Unknown:

That company, I love that company. I mean, if I was a

Unknown:

vegetarian, I think they'd make me eat meat. I'm just, I'm just

Unknown:

saying it's crazy. They have such a heart space. And they

Unknown:

have such good, good business, good business. And one of the

Unknown:

things that there was a report that came out they make

Unknown:

decisions that are for the greater good. They really make

Unknown:

heart heartfield decisions. I mean, when we look at the Chick

Unknown:

Fil A's they make they're not afraid to invest now for future

Unknown:

benefit. Yeah, yeah, notice, right. All of the Chick Fil A's

Unknown:

they're changing it. They're making double lanes. Quad lanes

Unknown:

simple.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, quad. It's amazing. thing.

Unknown:

I mean, it looks like a darn airport in there.

Guy Powell:

It looks like a taxi lines at the airport, you are so

Guy Powell:

right. And you know what's interesting, I was reading the

Guy Powell:

statistic that they have like four lanes, and like Donald's

Guy Powell:

might have one. And if they're lucky, they might have to. And

Guy Powell:

the wait time in the Chick fil A is less than it is than it is in

Guy Powell:

McDonald's. It is

Unknown:

and the quality, the quality of food, they're very

Unknown:

focused on quality and efficiency, the the quality,

Unknown:

when the Chick fil A app was launched, they they launched

Unknown:

with such care and precision, they actually wanted to hear

Unknown:

from customers. And as soon as you heard, they actually had a

Unknown:

team that all they did was look out for customer feedback, or

Unknown:

complaints or issues, right. And the app is so efficient, if you

Unknown:

forget to pick up your order. And this happened to me just the

Unknown:

other day, I placed an order and I was at the wrong location

Unknown:

because like they got the Chick fil A it was like five miles

Unknown:

apart and I didn't pay attention. So I've placed the

Unknown:

order on the app and I'm at the wrong location. I walked in

Unknown:

there and I'm like, What is taking so long I gotta go you

Unknown:

know, whatever it is like you don't have an order feels like I

Unknown:

placed in I showed the app and they knew the store and I'm

Unknown:

because oh my gosh, was Davis. That's the wrong store. But you

Unknown:

know what, let me see what you ordered. And I said, Well, how

Unknown:

do I refund it? There was like, well, let's just get you going

Unknown:

to get the refund. Let's just get you moving. Right?

Guy Powell:

They were so good. They are so my entire

Unknown:

order as I ordered it. And then the store in which I

Unknown:

was supposed to be at apparently the time kicked in. I get a

Unknown:

phone call. Miss Davis, your orders ready. I was like I feel

Unknown:

horrible. I'm so sorry. I feel like a dork. I'm at the wrong

Unknown:

store. I didn't know. Oh, well do you? Are you on the way we

Unknown:

can meet you outside? And we I was like, I'm sorry, I'm lost

Unknown:

the time I can't get there. Like, okay, we're so sorry. And

Unknown:

I was like, um, you don't have to give me a refund, it was my

Unknown:

mistake. Or mistake is we'll take care of it. How about they

Unknown:

pushed a free order to me for my inconvenience. I'm the one that

Unknown:

made the mistake. We're so sorry, you didn't get to come

Unknown:

here come and get a free sandwich.

Guy Powell:

They are such a good company. And you know, and even

Guy Powell:

even what's more incredible is their, their locations are so

Guy Powell:

enormous and the level of sales, and they're only open six days a

Guy Powell:

week.

Unknown:

I love it. I respect it. I've never gotten cold food.

Unknown:

I've never gotten poorly prepared food there. I mean, the

Unknown:

quality is always good. And two, this just kind of culminates

Unknown:

everything that we're talking about good business businesses

Unknown:

and hard people just make it complex. And I remember where

Unknown:

people were trying to shame Chick fil A for not being open

Unknown:

on a Sunday and so forth. And it's like, no, that is not our,

Unknown:

that's not what our beliefs, and I that was another level of

Unknown:

respect that I have for them. You know, that's another thing,

Unknown:

right? Guy, when you're in business, you've got to hold

Unknown:

your beliefs, right hold to your beliefs, just because you can

Unknown:

doesn't mean that you should. And that's something that in

Unknown:

business, we all have to learn to let lean on. Just because you

Unknown:

can doesn't mean that you should, right. And sure they can

Unknown:

be open seven days a week, but that doesn't mean that they

Unknown:

should, right. And even we, as we are in business, whenever we

Unknown:

go to either take on a client or take on a project or whatever,

Unknown:

we have to step back since and say hold on a second. Sure I can

Unknown:

do this, but should I

Guy Powell:

Right? And it comes up in every business and it is

Guy Powell:

it makes so much of a difference for the whole the whole business

Guy Powell:

all of the employees and how to make a decision. And you know

Guy Powell:

and especially nowadays when you think about you know PII

Guy Powell:

personally identifiable information and how you you

Guy Powell:

know, track that and how you guard that and protect it.

Guy Powell:

There's so many things that you could do, but you know, should

Guy Powell:

you do it is is is a really tough, and I think that's coming

Guy Powell:

up, gonna be coming up more and more here as we as as the

Guy Powell:

technology just kind of take over just about everything.

Unknown:

Agree, Agree technology is going to it does dictate a

Unknown:

lot of how we do things when we do things and stuff and things

Unknown:

like that, like what should we do? What shouldn't we do?

Unknown:

Technology, any business that runs from check technology is

Unknown:

looking for trouble. You can't run from technology, you cannot

Unknown:

run from technology. I tend to do what's called a like a simple

Unknown:

series of five simple steps series. And I'll post posted on

Unknown:

my YouTube channel and just to educate, give people something

Unknown:

to think about and I said okay, if anyone is still sending out

Unknown:

an attached Word document as an invoice to clients, asking

Unknown:

people to print it, write a check I put it in the mail,

Unknown:

snail mail it, we have got to talk, something's wrong, okay,

Unknown:

you cannot do this thing. This is the year, you know, send a

Unknown:

link, click a button, send a link, click a button, right? Or

Unknown:

when people start doing the back and forth something as basic as

Unknown:

booking time. Why do we have to have six different emails

Unknown:

exchanged about time? How about you just send a calendar link

Unknown:

booked time, but the time is efficiency and, and technology

Unknown:

and living in that when you start coming across businesses,

Unknown:

what customers and the marketplace gets exposed to

Unknown:

efficiency, in that matter, it now becomes an expectation. And

Unknown:

so when they come back to a company, or they go to a

Unknown:

company, and they don't have that same level of efficiency

Unknown:

and streamlining, they're like, oh, man, these guys are archaic?

Guy Powell:

Well, not absolutely. And that's where

Guy Powell:

Amazon has done. They have done such a good job with their user

Guy Powell:

interface and Chick fil A the same way. And sorry, I'm not

Guy Powell:

going to do a commercial for Chick fil A but but their their

Guy Powell:

methods are affecting everybody. Because when I go to Joe, you

Guy Powell:

know, Joe Blow down the street, and he doesn't have something

Guy Powell:

that's close to what Amazon is. I'd rather just buy it from

Guy Powell:

Amazon.

Unknown:

Yeah, that's what's happening. And that's that's the

Unknown:

struggle, right? You have businesses that they think that

Unknown:

they can get away with not rising to the occasion. Now a

Unknown:

mom and pop can't meet the demands or meet the level of

Unknown:

Amazon. But you can offer quality good service, you can

Unknown:

say, Listen, I can't I don't have it here. But I can order it

Unknown:

for you. I can get it for you. And case in point. My fiance and

Unknown:

I, we went to a store the other day. And the first person we

Unknown:

engaged with, see this is also marketing. This is branding,

Unknown:

right? The first person we engage with was very Oh, yeah,

Unknown:

we don't have that in here. I mean, if you want, listen to the

Unknown:

words correctly, right? If you want, you can go online and

Unknown:

search it up and order it. I mean, your store, you sell the

Unknown:

product. And so of course we were I was like, first of all,

Unknown:

my whole branding brain is like, who owns this joint? Like, what

Unknown:

in the world? What kind of what kind of customer service

Unknown:

training do we have? Like, anything is going off and I had

Unknown:

my coffee, I was sipping on my coffee. I was literally like

Unknown:

meditating on the way out. I was like, this makes no sense. So on

Unknown:

the way out, I said to my friends, so Oh, look at that

Unknown:

over there. And he was like, yeah, and there was another

Unknown:

young lady. She was hey, can I help you guys? And my sister was

Unknown:

like, no, because I'm the guy. And I'm like, well,

Unknown:

actually, you can.

Unknown:

Here's what we're looking for. Let me see. And let me tell you,

Unknown:

the experience was completely different. Let me go look and

Unknown:

see what we were back there already. And they got so we

Unknown:

appreciate all the help that you're doing. And she went back

Unknown:

there. And she looked and she checked. And then she went and

Unknown:

she goes, you know something? We don't have this one. But I can

Unknown:

order it. Give me a second. Can you guys wait until I get it

Unknown:

ordered? We'll have it in here if you want me to deliver it to

Unknown:

you whatever she got on her computer and took care of

Unknown:

everything. Yep, yep. As I sat there sipping my coffee.

Guy Powell:

And you know, the funny part is that, even though

Guy Powell:

they have more or less good customer service, it was the

Guy Powell:

training that failed with the other employee and that getting

Guy Powell:

that across the whole organization is so difficult,

Guy Powell:

especially when you have a lot of turnover and things like

Guy Powell:

that. I have so many more questions for you. But I mean, I

Guy Powell:

think we could go on for another couple hours yet. I do want to

Guy Powell:

ask you one more question that is, so what is the what's the

Guy Powell:

most important thing that you'd like to get across today?

Unknown:

The most important thing that I would like to get

Unknown:

across today is number one,

Unknown:

in business. Stay focused

Unknown:

and be intentional. Stay focused and be intentional. Don't get

Unknown:

distracted by the noise. Stay focused and be intentional.

Unknown:

There's a lot of noise out there. And if you don't be

Unknown:

careful, you'll get sucked in like a vacuum 2 billion things.

Unknown:

So that's on the business side. On the marketing side, what I

Unknown:

would say is the same thing. Get focused and intentional. Before

Unknown:

very clear about who you want to work with what clients you want

Unknown:

to serve, and then study your customer. Study your clientele,

Unknown:

and spend time chasing the clients that want to be caught.

Unknown:

Don't spend time chasing clients who do not want to be caught

Unknown:

that is a waste of energy, wasted time wasted money. So the

Unknown:

thing is focus and intentionality on both sides of

Unknown:

it. But always pay attention to your customer study your

Unknown:

customer know what they want. You know it's okay Need to go

Unknown:

the extra mile without charging that customer an extra $2? Yeah.

Unknown:

Okay, right. But focus, study them. And then again, spend time

Unknown:

chasing customers that want to be caught, as opposed to

Unknown:

customers that do not want to be caught.

Guy Powell:

Yeah, I always prefer going catching as opposed

Guy Powell:

to fishing. So I have one other very important question. And

Guy Powell:

that is, where can people reach you?

Unknown:

Absolutely. So the best way to find me is go to impact

Unknown:

branding consulting.org. That's impact branding consulting.org.

Unknown:

And you can find everything you need to know about me and it'll

Unknown:

connect you socially Gaul you can schedule a call or chat

Unknown:

anything. Is there, impact branding consulting.org.

Guy Powell:

Fantastic. Thank you, Natasha. Thank you. You've

Guy Powell:

been awesome. And I really, I would love to be able to spend

Guy Powell:

another couple hours. So we'll have to do this again. And we'll

Guy Powell:

have to get through the rest of the questions that I've got.

Unknown:

Thank you so much for having me. Absolutely. And

Guy Powell:

thank you, and thank you to everyone. Please stay

Guy Powell:

tuned for many other videos in this series of the backstory on

Guy Powell:

marketing, please visit marketing machine dot pro

Guy Powell:

relevant.com. And you can download the first chapter of my

Guy Powell:

upcoming book and also valuable other valuable excerpts.

Guy Powell:

Otherwise, don't forget to reach out to Natasha at impact

Guy Powell:

branding, consulting.org impact branding consulting.org And

Guy Powell:

otherwise, if you liked this episode, please rate it with

Guy Powell:

five stars. Thank you so much Natasha, and thanks. Thanks to

Guy Powell:

everyone.

All Episodes Previous Episode

ProRelevant Newsletter Opt-in

Thank you, you have been subscribed.
Show artwork for The Backstory on Marketing

About the Podcast

The Backstory on Marketing
with Guy Powell
Guy Powell, President of ProRelevant Marketing Solutions, interviews marketing and analytics experts about how the industry is evolving and what data-driven marketers need to succeed today. Find out more about Prorelevant Marketing Solutions at https://prorelevant.com/